Tag: deep

We did a deep dive into #GaysForTrump so you don’t have to and here’s what we found / Queerty

We did a deep dive into #GaysForTrump so you don’t

innocentgay

This tells us nothing. You didn’t summarize, repeat, speculate, or otherwise report what you found in any other way besides giving these people free views of their bullshit and idiocy. I haven’t explored those hashtags because I don’t want to give them any engagement, and you’ve done just that without any challenge or context whatsoever, just plunk, here’s some white supremacists and self-hating minorities, and here’s what they want to say!

I’m not normally one to go in on Queerty for low-effort reporting, but come on, this is not only low effort, but actually amplification of the messages of all these deplorables.

Rewrite it with some conclusions, please.

Shana reviews The Deep by Rivers Solomon  – The Lesbrary

Susan reviews The Lady’s Guide to Celestial Mechanics by Olivia

The Deep by Rivers Solomon

The Deep is the most beautiful book that I’ve read this year. It’s a lyrical novella based on a Hugo Award-nominated science-fiction song by clipping, a hip-hop group. The Deep is a reimagined mermaid story about an underwater society descended from African women tossed overboard during the transatlantic slave trade. We learn about the culture and history of these people, the wajinru, through the eyes of Yetu, their newest Historian.

Historians are responsible for holding the memories of every wanjinru who has lived, allowing individuals to live unburdened by the trauma of their collective past, only regaining temporary knowledge of their history through a yearly magic ritual. Yetu didn’t have a choice in taking on this calling, and she is overwhelmed by the weight of so many memories. In desperation, she tries to escape her role and carve a different path, one that brings her adventure, love with a surface dwelling “two-legged” woman, and a new respect for the power of memory.

Solomon packs a lot of eloquence into this small package and makes daring choices, like having the wanjinru appear fearsome to humans, rather than seductive sirens. The Deep feels longer than its 166 pages, in a good way. I enjoyed the wanjinru’s creative perspective on gender and relationships, and the way Solomon slowly explains the mystery of how their society came to be.

The story smoothly segues between Yetu’s present and the memories she carries. I sometimes dislike time jumps, but the inventive structure of the book made them feel seamless. However, I love complex worldbuilding and I found myself wishing for more explanation of the wanjinru’s fraught interactions with surface dwellers, alluded to through mentions of shipwrecks and oil rigs. The book’s atmospheric tone is gorgeous, but it also leaves some details to the reader’s imagination. For example, we never know exactly where in human geography Yetu is living.

The book imaginatively explores the nature and purpose of memories, generational trauma, and collective healing. It is so insightful that several times I gasped out loud while reading it. I appreciated the balance between the joy and ingenuity of the wajinru, and their painful history. I love books that use alternate history as social commentary and The Deep incorporates this with a light touch. It’s a powerful book, but also an engaging story with a sympathetic heroine. The Deep is a compelling and absorbing read that would appeal to lovers of feminist science fiction, underwater fantasy epics, or stories from the African diaspora.

What’s it like to be a gay adult film star mid-Covid? Jimmy Fowlie digs deep. / Queerty

What’s it like to be a gay adult film star

Nikki Spitz spent years priding himself on being the nastiest one in the room. Then Covid hit.

The adult industry, like so many other industries, was suddenly turned upside-down and lockdown made Spitz realize it’s pretty difficult to humiliate yourself on camera. Go on, try it; we’ll wait.

Related: WATCH: Find love in quarantine with Christine (and Jimmy Fowlie)

So Spitz, the latest sketch creation from comedian/writer Jimmy Fowlie, had to make some life changes.

Watch below, and bonus points to Fowlie for managing to squeeze in legitimately useful pandemic info: