Tag: family

Things are looking bad for Don Jr., Ivanka, and Eric as investigations into family business heat up / Queerty

Things are looking bad for Don Jr., Ivanka, and Eric

Don Jr., Ivanka, and Eric Trump “should be worried,” former White House Counsel John Dean warns.

Speaking to Don Lemon on CNN this week, Dean was asked about the ongoing investigations into the Trump Organization and whether the adult children of the ex-president might be in trouble.

Earlier this month, Don Jr. was deposed as part of the Washington, D.C. Attorney General’s lawsuit alleging the misuse of Trump inaugural funds. Jr. is also at the center of the Manhattan District Attorney’s office into the Trump Organization’s finances.

Meanwhile, Ivanka was deposed by lawyers from the DC Attorney General’s office in December, and Eric was deposed by the Manhattan DA’s office back in October.

Related: Ivanka freaks out on Twitter after being deposed by DC attorney general in ongoing investigation

“I think they should be worried,” Dean said matter-of-factly. He went on to explain that the Trump family has managed to weasel their way out of trouble with Manhattan DA Cy Vance in the past, but he doesn’t think that’s going to happen this time around.

“I don’t think [Vance] looks very favorably on the Trump family anymore, and he wants to clean up his reputation,” Dean said. “So, he’s probably being very aggressive about them and pursuing any potential criminality.”

On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court denied Trump’s last-ditch, years-long effort to keep his tax returns and other financial documents out of the hands of prosecutors.

As a result, millions of pages of documents were turned over the the Manhattan D.A.’s office, including tax returns, tax prep documents, financial statements, and communications related to the tax returns.

“There’s almost a terabyte of data,” Dean told Lemon. “That’s massive. That’s thousands upon thousands of documents.”

“This is going to show how they prepared the tax returns over the last eight years that they’re looking at. The memos back and forth. Records of phone calls where the accountants were being instructed. So, if there’s malfeasance, non-feasance or misfeasance in there it’s very likely to be in that terabyte.”

Related: Ivanka is clearly freaking out about going to jail, says she’s being “harassed”

Circling back to Don Jr., Dean explained that his involvement in the family business appears to have been limited, largely due to the fact that “his father didn’t have the greatest faith in his skills and abilities and he was often kept out of things.”

And all this time, we thought Eric was the dumb one.

Dean concluded by saying that there are a lot of directions the cases could go, and it will likely take time to sort everything out.

“Who knows where all this is going to go?” he said. “The conspiracy law in New York is very broad, as most states have, and they’ve been operating clearly in secret for a long time. And that’s what Mr. Vance is looking at. So, I think he’s got jeopardy.”

Watch.

Graham Gremore is the Features Editor and a Staff Writer at Queerty. Follow him on Twitter @grahamgremore.

I’m a pre hrt trans girl, still closeted publicly and with lots of family and a lot sucks, but today was a good day and my fiancé did my makeup and I felt happy. ❤️ : actuallesbians

I’m a pre hrt trans girl, still closeted publicly and

A place for discussions for and by cis and trans lesbians, bisexual girls, chicks who like chicks, bi-curious folks, dykes, butches, femmes, girls who kiss girls, birls, bois, aces, LGBT allies, and anyone else interested! Our subreddit is named r/actuallesbians because r/lesbians is not really for or by lesbians–it was meant to be a joke. We’re not a militant or exclusive group, so feel free to join up!

Lesbian teen who got kicked out by family turns them in as possible MAGA rioters / LGBTQ Nation

Lesbian teen who got kicked out by family turns them

The Capitol was vandalized during the 1/6 riots.

The Capitol was vandalized during the 1/6 riots.Photo: Shutterstock

An 18-year-old lesbian who says she has been kicked out of her home outed her Trump-loving family members who participated in a violent altercation in D.C. on the even of the MAGA riots at the Capitol last week after she saw pictures of them being shared on social media and people were trying to identify them.

“Hi this is the liberal lesbian of the family who has been kicked out multiple times for her views and for going to BLM protests to care what happens to me,” wrote Helena Duke in a tweet, who then proceeded to give her family members’ names in response to photos of the protest.

Related: Gay Trump supporter was proud to “storm the Capitol.” Now he says he’s “in fear for my life.”

Helena said that her mother Therese Duke turned off a location-tracking app they share last week and told her daughter that she was accompanying a family member for a medical appointment.

But on Thursday morning – the day after the riots that left five people dead at the Capitol in an attempt to overturn the 2020 election results, install Donald Trump as president for at least four more years, and execute Mike Pence – Helena’s cousin sent her a video of a violent encounter in D.C. on Tuesday evening, the day before the riots.

In the clip, a group of white people in the streets were harassing a Black woman. Helena saw her mother and her aunt and uncle, Annie and Richard Lorenz, and she saw that her mother had tried to grab the Black woman.

“My initial reaction was more like, ‘Oh my gosh, I was right. I was actually right about them being there,’” Helena told BuzzFeed News. “It was very surreal because it was an insane video, first of all, and then it was the revelation that, ‘Oh, that’s my mother. That’s her.’”

So she texted her mother and asked her how the “medical appointment” went.

“Please call me or talk to me if you really wanna know,” Therese replied.

Helena asked Therese where she was on Wednesday night, and she didn’t reply. She saw that people online were looking for the identities of the people in the viral video, so she decided to tell.

“Before President Trump was elected, she was a Democrat for the majority of her life,” Helena said of her mother. “And then, I don’t know what happened. Something switched in her brain, and she went through a very dramatic change to very far right.”

The lesbian teen participated in a Black Lives Matter protest earlier this year. When her mother found out, she kicked the teen out and told her that she believes that Black Lives Matter is “a violent organization and they would be inciting violence.”

“hi mom remember the time you told me I shouldn’t go to BLM protests bc they could get violent…this you?” Helena wrote in a later tweet.

The teen said that her family members have been contacting her to remove their names from her tweets.

“We are not proud of how things went in DC,” her aunt wrote in a text. “I know you are upset but putting us in danger isn’t going to solve anything. Please … I am Begging you to remove.”

But Helena said that she doesn’t believe she did anything wrong.

“I always felt almost heartbroken over how they viewed the world and how skewed it was and how they wouldn’t allow me to express my views. But showing that they can act in such a horrible way is just really appalling to me,” she said. “I am honestly very disappointed to have to be part of this family that is so…just, very not welcoming or supportive. I don’t feel safe being part of this family.”

It is currently unclear if Therese or the aunt and uncle participating in the riots at the Capitol the next day.

“Over the Shop” Is a Wordless, Joyous Book About Found Family

"Over the Shop" Is a Wordless, Joyous Book About Found

I told you there were going to be some good LGBTQ-inclusive kid’s books coming out this year…. Let’s start with a beautifully illustrated, wordless book about a child and her grandparent who need to find renters for the apartment above their shop—and end up welcoming just the couple they need.

Over the Shop - JonArno Lawson

JonArno Lawson, an award-winning Canadian novelist and poet, developed the story concept for Over the Shop, which was then brought to life through the images of Qin Leng, an award-winning designer and illustrator. The first few pages show us a day in the life of a young girl who lives with her gender-ambiguous grandparent in the rooms behind their run-down general store. The grandparent is busy getting food onto their table and running the shop; we sense that the girl is often left to her own devices. The girl is old enough that this doesn’t seem dangerous, but she exudes a certain loneliness.

One day, the grandparent puts up a sign advertising the apartment above the shop. People either aren’t interested or are turned off by the apartment’s shabby appearance. Then one day, a new couple stops by. One person is dark-skinned with long hair, and reads as female; the other is Asian with short hair and could be read as nonbinary, a transgender man, or a butch/masculine woman. Lawson’s dedication in the front of the book is “To trans activists of all ages,” so I’m guessing the character was intended as trans; without any clarification in the story itself, however, I think readers have some leeway in interpretation. Regardless, they’re a queer couple; the Asian person has a rainbow-hued belt that we see subtly in several scenes, and a rainbow hat in another.

The girl senses something positive about them and urges her grandparent to let them take the apartment. The grandparent gives them a critical look—we’re not sure if it’s because they’re a queer couple, a non-White and interracial couple, or because the grandparent is simply crotchety—but finally concedes. The couple soon begins to clean up the apartment, wave hello to a suspicious (and gender-ambiguous) neighbor, and engage the girl in their sprucing up. Their DIY projects spread beyond the apartment to the rest of the building, and eventually, they start helping at the store, too. The grumpy grandparent’s demeanor brightens; even the neighbor begins to freshen up the building next door. The transformations continue and a rainbow flag—the first on the block—is hung outside the store. We then see the girl, grandparent, couple, and neighbor sharing a meal together.

Leng’s watercolor-and-ink drawings are soft but dynamic, and offer many subtle details that will encourage multiple readings. The illustrations pack in more story than words could. She also gives us a secondary storyline involving a neighborhood cat, which I won’t spoil except to say that it’s sweet and adorable (and, you know, has a cat in it, which for me is worth bonus points).

I absolutely love this book on many levels. There are many possibilities for discussion: about acceptance of people who don’t look like us; about socioeconomic differences and struggles; about gender and whether knowing someone’s gender makes a difference; about friendship and helping; about neighborhood, community, and family. At the same time, the storytelling is simply a joy, without a hint of pedantry or preachiness. Add this book to your bookshelves today, or recommend it to your local school or library.

Like Leng’s drawings? Check out A Family Is a Family Is a Family, by Sara O’Leary, which she also illustrated—a story about different kinds of families.

“Over the Shop” Is a Wordless, Joyous Book About Found Family

Over the Shop - JonArno Lawson

I told you there were going to be some good LGBTQ-inclusive kid’s books coming out this year…. Let’s start with a beautifully illustrated, wordless book about a child and her grandparent who need to find renters for the apartment above their shop—and end up welcoming just the couple they need.

Over the Shop - JonArno Lawson

JonArno Lawson, an award-winning Canadian novelist and poet, developed the story concept for Over the Shop, which was then brought to life through the images of Qin Leng, an award-winning designer and illustrator. The first few pages show us a day in the life of a young girl who lives with her gender-ambiguous grandparent in the rooms behind their run-down general store. The grandparent is busy getting food onto their table and running the shop; we sense that the girl is often left to her own devices. The girl is old enough that this doesn’t seem dangerous, but she exudes a certain loneliness.

One day, the grandparent puts up a sign advertising the apartment above the shop. People either aren’t interested or are turned off by the apartment’s shabby appearance. Then one day, a new couple stops by. One person is dark-skinned with long hair, and reads as female; the other is Asian with short hair and could be read as nonbinary, a transgender man, or a butch/masculine woman. Lawson’s dedication in the front of the book is “To trans activists of all ages,” so I’m guessing the character was intended as trans; without any clarification in the story itself, however, I think readers have some leeway in interpretation. Regardless, they’re a queer couple; the Asian person has a rainbow-hued belt that we see subtly in several scenes, and a rainbow hat in another.

The girl senses something positive about them and urges her grandparent to let them take the apartment. The grandparent gives them a critical look—we’re not sure if it’s because they’re a queer couple, a non-White and interracial couple, or because the grandparent is simply crotchety—but finally concedes. The couple soon begins to clean up the apartment, wave hello to a suspicious (and gender-ambiguous) neighbor, and engage the girl in their sprucing up. Their DIY projects spread beyond the apartment to the rest of the building, and eventually, they start helping at the store, too. The grumpy grandparent’s demeanor brightens; even the neighbor begins to freshen up the building next door. The transformations continue and a rainbow flag—the first on the block—is hung outside the store. We then see the girl, grandparent, couple, and neighbor sharing a meal together.

Leng’s watercolor-and-ink drawings are soft but dynamic, and offer many subtle details that will encourage multiple readings. The illustrations pack in more story than words could. She also gives us a secondary storyline involving a neighborhood cat, which I won’t spoil except to say that it’s sweet and adorable (and, you know, has a cat in it, which for me is worth bonus points).

I absolutely love this book on many levels. There are many possibilities for discussion: about acceptance of people who don’t look like us; about socioeconomic differences and struggles; about gender and whether knowing someone’s gender makes a difference; about friendship and helping; about neighborhood, community, and family. At the same time, the storytelling is simply a joy, without a hint of pedantry or preachiness. Add this book to your bookshelves today, or recommend it to your local school or library.

Like Leng’s drawings? Check out A Family Is a Family Is a Family, by Sara O’Leary, which she also illustrated—a story about different kinds of families.

The post “Over the Shop” Is a Wordless, Joyous Book About Found Family appeared first on Mombian and is (c) Dana B. Rudolph LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Announcing the Mombian Database of LGBTQ Family Books, Media, and More

Announcing the Mombian Database of LGBTQ Family Books, Media, and

I am thrilled to reveal a project I’ve been working on for months (and in some ways, years): the Mombian Database of LGBTQ Family Books, Media, and More: over 500 books, music albums, movies, games, and toys for and about LGBTQ families. This is not just a booklist: you can search and filter by categories, tags, and more. Want board books with queer dads? Picture books starring Black transgender girls? Memoirs by queer moms about adoption? You can find them, among many other combinations!

The Mombian Database of LGBTQ Family Books, Media, and More

What sets this database apart from other LGBTQ-inclusive booklists is the searching and filtering. You can choose broad categories of age and type of media, then narrow down your results with tags for LGBTQ identities, racial/ethnic identities, subject matter, and more. You can also filter by writer/creator/director, illustrator, publisher, and publication date.

I’ve tagged books based on the sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, and racial/ethnic identities of protagonists and their families, but not of every character. I’ve tried to design all the tags to be specific enough to be useful without creating too many tags to wade through. Tagging each item involved many judgment calls; I’ve probably made mistakes or overlooked things (500+ items was a lot to process), which I will work to fix. Drop me a note if you catch anything, and please be kind; this was essentially a part-time, one-person project, with no funding (though my son helped with some of the data entry).

One important tag is “Incidental queerness,” for items in which the story isn’t “about” the characters’ LGBTQ identities. This is something I’ve very often heard LGBTQ parents asking for. Sometimes these are called “everyday” stories—but I also want to encourage more stories about LGBTQ families that aren’t just about our everyday family lives (we need intergalactic space adventures and fantastical journeys, too!), so I’m using a different term.

Another tag to know is “Character w/bias or misunderstanding of LGBTQ.” Many LGBTQ-inclusive kids’ books depict someone questioning or being hostile to LGBTQ people and families. These topics are important to discuss (though far from the only storylines we should have), but parents and teachers may also want to be careful about when and how they introduce them, lest they raise fears or concerns that weren’t there before. I’ve tagged items that deal with these topics so you can make the decision that feels right for your children.

Each item contains a brief description. For ones that I’ve reviewed at more length on my blog, I’ve provided a link to the review.

A big thanks to my son for his help with the data entry. He’s far too old now for the kids’ books, many of which I wish had been available when he was younger—but I’m delighted he helped create this resource for the next generation.

What’s Here and What’s Not (Yet)?

LGBTQ-inclusive picture books (including board books)

These are the majority of entries (over 300!), most from the past 15 years or so. Earlier works are more sporadic, although I am working to add more. They include books from mainstream publishers, small presses, and self-published efforts.

I have not included all self-published books, however. Many are great and may push boundaries of inclusion that books from mainstream publishers do not; I’ve tried to include those. LGBTQ kids’ literature began with such efforts. Others are highly derivative or otherwise of lesser quality. If I’ve missed something that you think worth considering, however (especially more recent ones I may have missed), please drop me a note and I’d be happy to consider it.

Books for grown-ups on LGBTQ Families

These include how-to guidebooks for LGBTQ parentsmemoirs and anthologies by LGBTQ parents and our grown children, social science studies about LGBTQ families, and books on LGBTQ inclusion in schools.

LGBTQ-inclusive middle-grade books

This is a much smaller collection than of picture books, because I can’t do everything and there have been so many picture books in recent years. I’ve included a number of them to get folks started, however.

There are no young adult books, since my site is aimed at parents; young adults are generally finding and choosing their own reading materials.

Kids’ music albums that are LGBTQ inclusive or expand ideas of gender

This is probably not a comprehensive list, but I’ve included a number that I know of.

Films about LGBTQ families

The current listings are documentaries and educational films for grown-ups, but I am working to include the growing number of LGBTQ-inclusive kids’ shows and movies—stay tuned; in the meantime, see this post, which rounds up a number of them, and my compilation of YouTube videos for and about LGBTQ families.

LGBTQ-inclusive games and toys

Dolls, building sets, and card games that showcase diverse families and gender identities/expressions.

Please Note

Inclusion of an item in the database is not necessarily a recommendation. I’ve included some problematic items that you may come across and indicated why they may be problematic.

While I’ve made efforts to ensure the data is accurate, I make no guarantees. This was a part-time, unfunded project done mostly by one person (me, with some help from my son on the data entry), using off-the-shelf WordPress plugins. I hope to continue improving it.

Purchasing

I’ve provided links to Amazon and Bookshop for each item, when available (though because of technical limitations, you’ll only see the Amazon link unless you click through to each individual item). Many people prefer Bookshop for the way that it supports independent bookstores; many LGBTQ-inclusive books, however, especially by independent creators, are only available on Amazon, and Amazon is often a little cheaper. I’ve therefore included links to both (when available) so that you can buy where it feels right to you. Additionally, some items are available only through the creators’ websites, in which case I’ve included links to those sites instead. And a few books are available to read free online (at Open Library or elsewhere), so I’ve included those links, too, as applicable.

As an Amazon Associate and a Bookshop Affiliate, I earn from qualifying purchases. This is part of how I am able to maintain Mombian. I’m also just as happy if you ask your local library or school to stock these items.

Going Forward

This is a work in progress. I’ll be adding to the database as new books and other items come out this year. (I already have a number on my radar, but if you know of any, please let me know.) I’ll also be adding LGBTQ-inclusive kids’ movies and television shows, refining tags, and filling in some of the other gaps noted above.

I hope you find this useful!

A family friendly holiday book from True Colors Lab – Lesbian.com

A family friendly holiday book from True Colors Lab –

Special to lesbian.com

“Two Dads Under the Christmas Tree” brings to you fun, touching moments, and a deep sense of humanity as you experience Jayden’s first year with his two dads. In an effort to raise awareness about adoption throughout the world both the Italian and Spanish editions are also available. These editions will help reach countries where same-sex couples and single individuals who wish to adopt are discouraged or even denied.

Preface

My name is Jayden. I was born on the night of December 24, 2017 in Washington, D.C. in the United States, and this is my story. Or maybe, I should say my first story…

***
No matter how hard I try, my memories of the first few days are jumbled, to say the least. I can only say that at some point – I don’t know how, I don’t know why – I managed to get out – thank goodness! – from that dark, damp tunnel in which I had been floating for about nine months.

Let’s be clear: I’m not complaining, but a little fresh air after so much seclusion has never hurt anyone.
In short, I was out! And although the light was a little too bright for my liking, and someone had been shouting and fussing all throughout the process, I felt quite satisfied with myself.

Since the beginning, I think I slept a lot and, in addition to a sensation of total relaxation, I do remember many excellent bottles of milk and people of all kinds constantly fumbling with me, flipping me over like a small chicken on the grill, and the pleasant feeling of being in the clouds.

Then, suddenly, I was in a rather cozy home with soft lights and gentle whispers filling the air. Outside the window, I saw little pieces of cotton falling out of the sky and… two dads under the Christmas tree.

Month 1

My crib is absolutely soothing and I plan on spending as much time in it as I possibly can. Even the background music – this guy Mozart – is not bad and it helps me sleep pretty well.

And the room service is top notch. With one cry, the staff starts moving. With two cries, one dad enters the room and the other one goes to the kitchen. With three, I already have the bottle in my mouth.

Sometimes, even if I’m not hungry, I try to play if the “call service” works and I punctually see them jump.

In fact, I think they are a little tense. A dozen times a day, even at night, they suddenly undress me looking for a dirty viper – that’s what they say. I don’t know exactly what they do, because unfortunately, I can’t see well from my position, but for a while they lift my legs up and down and never find anything.

And every time, they talk about a certain ointment to put on me, which, in my opinion, smells terribly like poop and is probably good for keeping vipers away.

Today, when I woke up, there were many people bent over me. My dads said they were friends who came to visit me. But what kind of friends were those?

They all tried to kidnap me or use me like a football! Dads were vigilant, though, and everything went well.
Well, all of it, except for the huge puke I threw up on a lady who bounced me for ten minutes straight with a stupid smile on her face.

In the end, she was no longer laughing.

The following excerpts are from Tobias Mile’s new book “Two Dads Under the Christmas Tree” (True Colors Lab, LLC Publishing, 2020) and are reprinted with permission from the publisher.

Watch: LGBTQ Legal Experts Talk 2nd-Parent Adoption and Other Ways to Protect Your Family

Watch: LGBTQ Legal Experts Talk 2nd-Parent Adoption and Other Ways

Two LGBTQ legal experts recently spoke on a GLAD panel about second-parent (co-parent) adoptions, Voluntary Acknowledgments of Parentage, and other ways LGBTQ parents can secure our legal relationships with our children. Regardless of who is in the White House, the U.S. Supreme Court remains conservative, and these actions are an important way of protecting our families. Watch the video now.

Patience Crozier, GLAD senior staff attorney, and Joyce Kauffman, GLAD board chair and lead attorney at Kauffman Law & Mediation, are not only attorneys, but also queer parents themselves. They understand both the legal and the emotional side of all this. They speak about why second-parent adoptions are necessary (even if you’re married!) and what to expect during the process; how Voluntary Acknowledgements of Parentage offer some LGBTQ parents another path to legal recognition; how likely they think it is that marriage equality could be overturned and what might happen to existing same-sex spouses in that case, and more.

The summary? “The good news is that there are ways to make sure your family is legally protected, and if you’ve already taken those steps they can’t be undone,” GLAD says.

Their focus is somewhat on New England, which is GLAD’s ambit—but even if you live elsewhere, I think you may also find much of this useful, if only to help you then ask better questions of lawyers and policymakers in your state.

Watch the video here—but please also visit the GLAD website for links to all the resources mentioned during the panel, along with additional legal information on parenting and other topics.

Vote Like Your Family Depends on It – Because It Does

Vote Like Your Family Depends on It - Because It

This election could be more consequential for LGBTQ families—and for the future of our country in general—than any other in history. Go vote if you haven’t; help someone else get to the polls if you can. Here are a few tips.

Vote for our Families

Key Info

Helpful Tips

  • Wear a mask and follow social distancing rules. Use hand sanitizer before and after you vote. See also these voting safety tips from CNN.
  • Plan to wait in line. Dress for the weather since you may be outdoors. Bring food and water if you think you’ll need it.
  • Review what’s on your ballot ahead of time to minimize time at the polling place.
  • Make sure to vote all the way down the ballot, not just for the president.
  • Help a relative, friend, or neighbor find where to vote and what to bring. Offer to drive them if you can and you feel it’s safe (i.e., you’ve both been social distancing, will wear masks, and show no signs of COVID-19).
  • Note that several ride services (like Lyft and Uber) are offering free or discounted rides to get to the polls today.
  • Leave the kids at home if you can (unless they’re of voting age and voting, too). Any other year, I’d say bring them along to show them what participatory democracy looks like. This year, because of the pandemic and expected long lines, it’s probably best not to, unless you have no other choice (in which case make sure to bring some books or toys to amuse them in line).

Vote for our families, our country, and the world we want to see. Our work won’t end after the election, no matter the results, but let’s see if we can get things headed in a better direction.

Family home draped with Pride flags vandalised by homophobes

homophobic graffiti

A quiet suburban family home decorated with Pride flags and signs was targeted by homophobic vandals who plastered the walls with hateful graffiti.

The house in Barrington, Illinois, had rainbow-decorated trees lining the driveway and an array of positive signs in the backyard, including one that read: “Love and peace over hate.”

Sadly it seems a homophobic thug took that as a challenge, as one morning they were replaced with vile, homophobic slurs.

Barrington local Kiki Angelos spotted the scene as she was out on her morning run. “The first thing I did was notice was the house and its signage, because it had a lot of positive messages in the front yard – which of course, you know, resonates with me,” she told CBS Chicago.

She stopped in disbelief when she saw the anti-LGBT+ graffiti scrawled on the garage, exterior brick walls and side doors of the home.

“It was a stab to the heart,” she said. “[I was] horrified, because it hit me personally. I have two children who identify as queer; a transgender son.”

Angelos raised awareness of the crime on social media as it is such an unusual case in the neighbourhood, and encouraged locals to vote in the upcoming election.

“I will not be silent, and no one should be scared to publicly express who they are in a loving way,” she said. “This community is going to rally around them and support them.”

Police are treating the vandalism as a potential hate crime, and believe it happened sometime overnight on October 17.

They are currently looking through footage on private security cameras to find the culprit, and a $2,500 reward has been offered for anyone who provides information leading to an arrest.

The family whose house was defaced declined to speak to local news, asking for privacy during this time.