Tag: Graham

Franklin Graham hits out at Pope Francis for ‘normalising homosexuality’

Franklin Graham hits out at Pope Francis for 'normalising homosexuality'

Evangelical preacher Franklin Graham has lashed out at Pope Francis for “trivialising Christ’s sacrifice” by “normalising homosexuality”.

Pope Francis suggested in a documentary that premiered on Wednesday (October 21) that gay people “have a right to be part of the family” and threw his support behind “civil union law” so same-sex relationships can be “legally covered”.

The comments made global headlines and represented a major break from traditional Catholic teaching.

And it’s safe to say that Franklin Graham is not impressed.

In a lengthy Facebook post on Thursday (October 22), Graham hit out at Pope Francis, branding his comments “unthinkable in light of the Word of God”.

Graham went on to reference the Old Testament in his efforts to prove that the family is composed of a “male husband and a female wife” and a number of children.

The right-wing preacher suggested that the love of God is “completely inclusive”, but went on to claim that people must “repent” in order for society to be “saved”.

Franklin Graham hit out at Pope Francis for ‘trivialising Christ’s sacrifice’.

“For Pope Francis to attempt to normalise homosexuality is to say that Holy Scriptures are false, that our sins really don’t matter, and that we can continue living in them,” Graham wrote.

“If that were true, then Jesus Christ’s death, burial, and resurrection wouldn’t have been needed. The cross would have been for nothing. No one has the right or the authority to trivialise Christ’s sacrifice on our behalf.”

Graham continued: “I want everyone to know the truth and to find the peace that come sonly from fully surrendering our lives to Him and His commands.

“The consequence of an unrepentant, unbelieving heart is also clear in the Word of God – eternal death.

“Unless we repent and receive His offer of forgiveness, surrendering our lives to Him, we will spend eternity as part of a different family when we leave this earth – the family of the condemned.”

No one has the right or the authority to trivialise Christ’s sacrifice on our behalf.

Graham’s firm rebuke came just hours after Pope Francis sent shockwaves across the world when his comments were revealed in the documentary Francesco, which debuted at the Rome Film Festival on Wednesday.

His pro-gay remarks came as a surprise to many within the LGBT+ community, as the pope has previously kept firmly with Catholic Church teachings that oppose any progress in LGBT+ rights.

In 2013, he made global headlines when he called on the Catholic church to “show mercy, not condemnation” to gay people – representing a stark shift in tone from his predecessors.

But in 2019, he told a Spanish newspaper that parents who see signs of homosexuality in their children should “consult a professional” – a comment that was considered by many to endorse conversion therapy.

Meanwhile, he has been staunch in his opposition to trans identities, comparing them to nuclear war and genetic manipulation in 2015.

In 2019, the Vatican released a document claiming that “gender ideology” is a “move away from nature”.

 

Graham Norton pays tribute to activists who ‘fought for tolerance’ in Ireland

Graham Norton

Graham Norton on December 4, 2018 in London, England. (David M. Benett/Dave Benett/Getty)

Graham Norton has paid tribute to those who “fought for tolerance in Ireland” while admitting that he “took the easy way out” by moving to London.

The BBC presenter, 57, grew up in Bandon, County Cork in Ireland before moving to London to pursue an acting career.

Born in 1963, Norton grew up in an Ireland that was steeped in Catholicism and where LGBT+ people were not welcomed.

Homosexuality was finally decriminalised in the country in 1993, while same-sex marriage was introduced in 2015. These changes did not happen by themselves – they were the result of decades of activism from queer people who fought tirelessly for change.

In the acknowledgements for his new book Home Stretch, Norton paid tribute to “all the people who stayed in Ireland to fight for the modern tolerant place it has become”, and said he “took the easy way out” by moving to London.

Graham Norton left Ireland and ‘moved where the gays were’.

Speaking to the Irish Independent, Norton said: “I moved where the gays were. I went to London. Where nobody knew me so there was none of that scariness and there were gay bars that were just on the street so I could walk in, and meet other gay people.”

He added: “And I don’t want to be glib about it, because those people who stayed, who went on the marches and did the petitions, are nameless and faceless and I’ll never get to actually thank them, but they did the hard work.

People should be proud of themselves. Ireland is transformed.

“I am aware that Ireland isn’t Nirvana – and I think if young people hear me talking they’ll think ‘what is wrong with him? It’s horrible here…’ Well, try being here in the late 70s!

“People should be proud of themselves. Ireland is transformed.”

Elsewhere in the interview, Norton said that he and his contemporaries, like Irish drag queen Panti Bliss, grew up in a society where being gay was not celebrated.

“You’re not going to go ‘yippee!’ You know it’s not a choice, you know it’s not something you did, but you feel like you’re less than.

“You feel like you failed. You don’t want to test people’s love, because you don’t love you.”