Tag: hes

Pablo Alborán says he’s just a normal guy who happens to be gay and an international superstar / Queerty

Pablo Alborán says he’s just a normal guy who happens

This profile is part nine of Queerty’s 2020 Out For Good series, recognizing public figures who’ve had the courage to come out and make a difference in the past year, in celebration of National Coming Out Day on October 11.

Name: Pablo Alborán, 31

Bio: The Spanish crooner first burst onto the music scene in 2011 with his self-tiled album, which was certified six-time platinum and earned him three Latin Grammy Awards nominations. His follow-up album Tanto was released a year later and certified platinum ten times over. To date, he has released four studio albums, two live albums, and an EP, all of which have topped the charts.

Coming out: To commemorate Pride month this year, Alborán posted a short video to Instagram announcing to his 5 million followers that he’s gay.

“We need to reconsider our lives, careers, what does and doesn’t make us happy,” he said in the video. “I think that we often forget about the love that unites us and makes us stronger.”

“I’m here to tell you that I am homosexual and it’s okay. Life goes on, everything will remain the same, but I’m going to be a little happier than I already am.”

Finding my flock: After coming out, Alborán not only made international headlines, he attracted new fans and followers from all over the world. Speaking to GQ Spain in September, he said he never expected his three-minute video, which he recorded on the fly, to garner the kind of attention it did.

“I have received a flood of love and stories that I swear I did not imagine,” he said, adding that he’s heard from mothers who used his coming out video to teach their children about LGBTQ people, and fans were inspired by it to share their own truths.

“I’m a normal guy, who laughs at everything, who wants to have fun,” he added. “And now, in addition, I can look at people and say: this is me.”

But that’s only half the story. By coming out, people can look at Alborán and say “He came out. I can too.” That, folks, is finding a flock.

Eric Trump clarifies he’s not actually LGBT+ after ‘misspeaking’ on live TV

Eric Trump clarifies he's not actually LGBT+ after 'misspeaking' on

Eric Trump visits FOX Business Network’s Maria Bartiromo at FOX Studios on October 4, 2016 in New York City. (Astrid Stawiarz/Getty)

Eric Trump has clarified that he is not actually a member of the LGBT+ community, after accidentally “coming out” during a live Fox News interview.

The president’s second-oldest and second-worst son, who has two children with his wife Lara Trump, was insisting that there was a lot of support for his father within the LGBT+ community on Fox and Friends on Monday (September 28).

But during the live interview, Trump said: “The LGBT+ community, they are incredible. You should see how they come out in full force for my father every single day.

“I’m part of that community, and we love the man, and thank you for protecting our neighbourhoods and thank you for protecting our cities.”

His “coming out” caused extreme confusion, with Bobby Lewis of Media Matters, sharing the clip on Twitter and writing: “Eric Trump coming out is not the birthday gift this homosexual wanted.”

Trump’s comments even led to his Wikipedia page being swiftly updated to say: “On September 29, 2020, Eric came out as a member of the LGBT community.”

Trump has now clarified that he “misspoke”, and is not actually queer, insisting that he was simply paraphrasing what LGBT+ people apparently say about his dad.

He told the New York Post: “To clarify, many of our close friends are part of the LGBT community, which was the intent of my statement — the left has taken that vote for granted for a long time and support from the gay community for my father is incredible.”

“As to me personally, as I think you know, I am a happily married man to my wife, Lara,” he added. Trump also confirmed that he is not bisexual.

As one Twitter user put it: “Eric Trump: ‘I’m not LGBT. I was speaking for LGBT people.’

“The LGBT community must be thrilled about their new spokesperson.”

 

 

Sportscaster caught using antigay slur insists he’s never said it before. Sure, Jan. / Queerty

Sportscaster caught using antigay slur insists he’s never said it

Last month, the Cincinnati Reds pulled sports broadcaster Thom Brennaman from their game after he used a homophobic slur on air.

Video of the incident went viral and Brennaman, 56, was placed on indefinite suspension.

Now he’s speaking for the first time, embarking on an apology tour that draws into question his level of sincerity.

“Believe me, I know there are a lot of people who are still very angry and I understand that,” Brennaman told The New York Post.

He arranged a lunch meeting with Evan Millward, a gay Cincinnati newscaster, who told the Post, “It was pretty clear to me early on that he was not using me.”

Reflecting on the experience, Brennaman said:

“Everything happened so fast. And I’m watching literally everything fall apart at the seams while trying to announce a baseball game.

“I couldn’t even tell you what happened, where it came from. … Look, I said it is all that matters. The rest of it is irrelevant. I said it. And I own it. And I’m the one who has to live with it.”

But Brennaman may have taken his remorse act a bit too far when he added, “I have never used that word (before) in my life.”

Ryan Messer, an LGBTQ activist in Cincinnati, isn’t buying that part. Nor should anyone with half a brain. But still, Messer sees more value in opening a conversation with Brennaman than simply hitting the “cancel” button.

“If he used it then, he used it before,” Messer said. But “if we don’t open the dialogue to help explain (the meaning behind the word), how do we learn and grow from it? And that’s where my whole perspective comes, and I’m willing to make sure he understands that, which is why he is coming to my house Saturday to meet my family, my husband and four kids.”

“If I get another chance, someone will be hiring a better person than the person who walked out the door that night on Aug. 19,” Brennaman insists.