Tag: man

Man Place B&B – Gay Owned Bed & Breakfast in Purgitsville, West Virginia

Man Place B&B - Gay Owned Bed & Breakfast in Purgitsville, West Virginia

Man Place B&B - Gay Owned Bed & Breakfast in Purgitsville, West Virginia

Man Place B&B – 65 PRIVATE ACRES IN WV MOUNTAINS

Welcome to Man Place, a unique clothing optional West Virginia bed and breakfast in the mountains of the Potomac Highlands. Man Place is surrounded by sixty-five private acres, and clothing is optional inside and out.

Close to Man Place, you’ll find many recreational options, most within an easy hour or two hour drive. There are more than a million acres of national forest lands nearby, including many state parks and forests, tons of hiking trails, and other recreational options. There are so many great things to do outdoors that you’ll have a hard time deciding what to do first.

You’ll also find steam trains, river rafting, spelunking and cavern tours, rock climbing, hiking and 4WD wheeling. if you want something a little less active, you can shop local antique stores and artisan shops in charming towns, visit historical sites, or attend one of the many fairs and festivals across the region in the summertime.

See the Man Place B&B Expanded Listing on Purple Roofs Here

West Virginia Gay Friendly Bed and Breakfasts, Hotels, and Vacation Rentals

Joe Biden invited to Nigeria to ‘marry a man’ by raging homophobic bishop

Bishop Emmah Isong of the Pentecostal Fellowship of Nigeria

An anti-LGBT+ bishop from Nigeria has suggested that if Joe Biden wants the country to decriminalise homosexuality, he should take a Nigerian man as his “second wife”.

The angry tirade comes after Biden vowed to advance the cause of LGBT+ rights around the world, threatening financial sanctions on regimes deemed to have infringed on the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and intersex people.

A memo signed by Biden on 4 February instructed US government agencies to “strengthen existing efforts to combat the criminalisation by foreign governments of LGBTQI+ status or conduct”.

It added: “When foreign governments move to restrict the rights of LGBTQI+ persons or fail to enforce legal protections in place, thereby contributing to a climate of intolerance, agencies engaged abroad shall consider appropriate responses, including using the full range of diplomatic and assistance tools and, as appropriate, financial sanctions, visa restrictions, and other actions.”

Preacher says Joe Biden should come to Nigeria and marry a man

Speaking to African outlet Sahara Reporters, bishop Emmah Isong of the Pentecostal Fellowship of Nigeria hit out at Biden in the wake of the memo, defending Nigeria’s laws criminalising homosexuality.

He said: “I personally take it as a rumour that America wants to sanction governments that are anti-gay. The US has not communicated officially with the government of Nigeria.

“Let there be an official gazetted letter signed by the Secretary of State of the United States telling us to become gay, then we invite the president of the US to come and marry a man in Nigeria as his second wife.

“He must practise what he’s preaching, if the president of America wants Nigeria to practise gay, he should come and marry a man from here so we will know he means business.”

US President Joe Biden
US President Joe Biden (Getty/SAUL LOEB)

He added: “Every nation is equal in the comity of nations. America is a country that believes in the tenets of democracy which is freedom of speech, and I believe that Nigeria is an independent nation, we are not a nation under America.

“We are not among the states under American nation. We have the right to be anti-gay, I believe no one can sanction us for that.

“If they sanction us for being against gays, we can sanction them for believing in it… the worst thing they can do is raise their visa fees and we raise ours too and they reduce it and apologise and we also reduce ours and apologise.”

Nigeria maintains strict anti-gay laws

Homosexuality is illegal in Nigeria and is punished by up to 14 years in prison.

A law passed by former Nigerian president Goodluck Jonathan in 2014 bans same-sex relationships, and also makes a person who “registers, operates or participates in gay clubs, societies and organisation, or directly or indirectly make public show of same-sex amorous relationship” liable for 10 years in prison.

In October, a judge threw out charges against 47 men arrested under the country’s anti-gay law after a raid on a hotel.

Board Book with Same-Sex Parents, Gender Creative Kids, and Pregnant Trans Man Wins Prestigious Stonewall Book Award

Stonewall Book Award Winners for LGBTQ Kids’ and Young Adult

The American Library Association (ALA) today announced its 2021 Stonewall Book Awards for LGBTQ-inclusive children’s and young adult books, part of the Youth Media Awards that also include the prestigious Newbery and Caldecott Medals. The winner was a board book that includes not only same-sex parents, but also gender creative kids and a pregnant transgender man.

We Are Little Feminists: Families

The Stonewall Book Awards — Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s & Young Adult Literature Award (to distinguish them from the Stonewall Book Awards for adult books) are chosen by a committee of the ALA’s Rainbow Round Table, “the oldest professional association for LGBTQIA+ people in the United States.” This year’s winner is:

  • We Are Little Feminists: Families, by Archaa Shrivastav (Little Feminist), a board book that uses simply rhymes to celebrate many types of families as it shows photos of real families around the world engaged in everyday activities. While other books may have similar themes, this one is notable for the photos of actual families and the broad LGBTQ inclusion. Several of the families include two moms and two dads; there are also children who seem nonbinary or gender creative, and one image of a transgender man who is pregnant. (Readers may recognize him as trans advocate Trystan Reese, who posts about his family on Instagram at @biffandi.) Some images are below; note the publisher has not made the one with Reese available to the media, but it’s very similar to this one on his Instagram. This is truly a joyous book that belongs in any library or bookshelf for young children.

Four honor books were also selected:

  • Beetle & The Hollowbones, written and illustrated by Aliza Layne (Atheneum Books for Young Readers): In this middle grade graphic novel, 12-year-old goblin-witch Beetle, who lives in the eerie town of ‘Allows, fits in neither as a sorceress nor as a ghost whose spirit is trapped in the mall, like her nonbinary best friend Blob Ghost. When Beetle’s old best friend, Kat Hollowbone, returns to town for a sorcery apprenticeship with her Aunt Hollowbone, Beetle is reminded of her inadequacy. Yet plans are afoot that endanger Blob Ghost and force Beetle to act, confronting her fears and her feelings for Kat. A fun and clever story that is surprisingly human despite the fantastical characters.
  • You Should See Me in a Crown, by Leah Johnson (Scholastic): In this middle grade novel, Liz Lighty is a Black, nerdy, poor, wallflower, which sets her apart in her small, rich, Midwestern town. But when a scholarship to an elite college falls through, she unexpectedly finds herself in the social spotlight, running for prom queen and the prize money that brings. As if that’s not hard enough, she may also be falling for one of her competitors. Full review.
  • Darius the Great Deserves Better, by Adib Khorram (Dial Books): This sequel to Khorram’s young adult novel Darius the Great Is Not Okay, continues the story of Darius, an out gay Iranian American teen navigating romantic relationships and family as well as bullying, racism, and his family’s financial struggles. He also has queer grandmothers.
  • Felix Ever After, by Kacen Callender (Balzer + Bray): A young adult novel about a Black, transgender teen whose plan to foil transphobic harassment lands him in an unexpected love triangle—but also leads him to redefine how he feels about himself.

In addition to the above, Welcoming Elijah: A Passover Tale with a Tail, by Lesléa Newman and illustrated by Susan Gal (Charlesbridge) won the Sydney Taylor Book Award, presented annually to “outstanding books for children and teens that authentically portray the Jewish experience.” While the LGBTQ content is slight (one pair of visiting relatives to the Passover seder is a two-dad couple), I’m still going to mention it. Newman, author of Heather Has Two Mommies and many other LGBTQ-inclusive works, arguably brought LGBTQ picture books into mainstream awareness, so I’m happy to celebrate any recognition of her work. Full review.

And queer mom Jacqueline Woodson won the Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award for her middle grade novel Before the Ever After (Nancy Paulsen Books) about a 12-year-old whose father, a retired football player, is grappling with traumatic brain injury.

The full list of ALA Youth Media Award winners is here.

Congratulations to them all!


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A Doctor, a Soldier, and a Transgender Man: Picture Book Tells Story of Dr. James Barry

A Doctor, a Soldier, and a Transgender Man: Picture Book

A picture book biography offers an inspiring portrait of Dr. James Barry, a 19th-century British surgeon and soldier who was assigned female at birth but lived his life as a man.

Were I Not a Girl - Lisa Robinson

Were I Not a Girl, by Lisa Robinson, illustrated by Lauren Simkin Berke (Schwartz & Wade Books), first asks us to “Imagine living at a time when you couldn’t be the person you felt you were inside.” James Barry, we learn, “refused to let that happen.”

Barry was born in Ireland around 1789, and given a girl’s name. Girls at the time were not sent to school and could not own property or hold most jobs. “Were I not a girl, I would be a soldier,” Barry wrote. After Barry’s father abandoned the family, Barry (still living as a young woman) and his mother fled to London, but Barry was too uneducated to find work as a governess. He was eventually was taught by a friend of the family, and developed the desire to become a doctor.

Barry then “took charge,” shedding women’s clothing, cutting his hair, taking the name “James Barry,” and emerging as a man. After becoming a doctor and “quite a dandy,” he enrolled in the army and travelled the world, along the way delivering babies, fighting a duel, falling in love, and demanding proper care for people in prisons and hospitals. Eventually, he rose to be Inspector General of Hospitals in the army. His birth sex was found out when he died in his 70s.

We don’t know exactly how old he was when he died, however. That’s just one of many unanswered questions about Barry’s life, Robinson notes. As with much of history, sometimes “answers remain hidden.” What is clear, however, is that “James was living his truth.”

An afterward offers more details about Barry’s life as well as a discussion of what it means to be transgender. Robinson gives two other examples of early modern people who were assigned female at birth, lived as men to serve in the army, but then returned to living as women. Barry, in contrast, “strived to maintain that identity throughout his life,” making it likely that he was what we would now call transgender. Robinson uses female pronouns for Barry in the part of the book discussing his childhood, but switches to male ones once he transitions.

Berke’s illustrations capture muted 19th-century tones, brightened by the red of Barry’s army uniform. This project was “particularly meaningful,” they say in an Illustrator’s Note, since they identify as nonbinary, and the book “highlights that transgender people have always existed and were able to figure out how to succeed on their own terms.”

One fact seems wrong: In the afterward, Robinson says that in 1826, Barry performed “the first documented caesarean in which both the mother and the baby survived”—yet there was one (not by Barry) in 1794; I think the best we can say is that Barry might have done the first successful, documented one by a European surgeon in the British Empire (but I’m not enough of an expert to know if even that is correct).

That small point aside, I love this story, which blends a knowledge of the limits of history with a respectful desire to try and reflect Barry’s life as he saw it. Contrast this with Rough, Tough Charley, the 2007 book by Verla Kay about 19th-century stagecoach driver Charley Parkhurst, which calls Parkhurst “a woman in disguise” upon the deathbed reveal of his birth sex and uses female pronouns for him on the last page. Were I Not a Girl is much the better book for an LGBTQ-inclusive collection. Kudos, too, to the publisher, Schwartz & Wade (an imprint of Penguin Random House) for noting in its promotional blurb that Barry “would live a rich full life.” That’s a model transgender children today deeply deserve (and one that can benefit their cisgender peers as well).

Were I Not a Girl is in fact the second picture book published in 2020 about a historical figure whom we would today call a transgender man: The Fighting Infantryman, by Rob Sanders, tells the story of Albert D. J. Cashier, who fought in the U.S. Civil War. (Full review.) Let’s hope that these two titles, good as they are, aren’t the last.


(As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.)

Gay Black man stabbed and left in coma but his attackers are still free

Anthony Crumbley, a gay Black man who was stabbed, alongside a CCTV photo of suspects

Police have released a CCTV photo of people they would like to speak to in connection with the attack on Anthony Crumbley. (GoFundMe and Boston Police Department)

A gay Black man in Boston, Massachusetts, who was stabbed and left in a coma for four days, is living in fear knowing his attackers are still “out there”.

Anthony Crumbley was walking home from a bar in South Boston at about 10.45 pm on 18 December when he was attacked, according to CBS Boston.

The 25-year-old said: “The two males and a female approached me and two males attacked me and stabbed me in my neck and in my stomach, and pretty much ran and left me there.”

Suffering life-threatening injuries and left the bleed out on the ground, Crumbley was taken to Boston Medical Center where he spent four days in a coma in the hospital’s ICU.

Police have released a CCTV photo of people they would like to speak to in connection with the attack, but reportedly said they have no reason to believe the stabbing was a hate crime.

Crumbley insisted: “I believe it was an attack that had to do with gay hate because, you know, I dress very femme and I’m a very outspoken person.”

Still recovering in hospital, the young gay man said he is living in fear and struggling to make ends meet after being stabbed.

He wrote on a GoFundMe page: “No one has been arrested for doing this to me and I’m scared, truthfully, knowing they are still out there on the streets and could do this to me again at anytime.

“This traumatising situation has left me hopeless, after waking up from being in a coma for four days in the ICU at Boston Medical and I’m STILL here in the ICU now writing this on my birthday, December 26th.”

Crumbley’s mother passed away one year ago, and he is the legal guardian of his 12-year-old sister.

He continued: “Before all this happened I was very energetic and outgoing, always doing what was needed to make ends meet for me and my younger sister.  I just don’t know how I’m going to make ends meet now with this gained disability from my attackers.”

He said that after the attack, his left arm is now not functional because of “the severed nerves in my C6 section of my shoulder”.

He continued: “I have to figure out how I’m going to ever finish raising my sister the way she deserves and give her everything I never had… Working won’t be an option for me at the moment until I can fully recover, so even though this hurts me and is so embarrassing to say I’m asking for help from anyone and everyone who knows me personally or who this even touches the slightest.”

Anyone with information is asked to call Boston Police at 617-343-4742.

Man punches bus passenger and says “I hate gay people” / Queerty

Man punches bus passenger and says “I hate gay people”

Law enforcement officials in New York City have made an appeal to the public in hopes of identifying a suspect in a hate crime.

The attack in question occurred November 22 on the M23 bus in Chelsea just before 5 PM. Video footage of the encounter taken from security cameras shows the suspect–a middle-aged white man–punching a teenager.

According to the victim–whose name has not been made public–the suspect approached him saying “You have long hair. I don’t like people like you.”

The suspect then added “I hate gay people,” reports The New York Post

Related: His attackers yelled “f*ggot” as they beat him. Cops say it’s not a hate crime.

The man then followed the victim as he exited the bus, where he then punched the teenager in the face. The man then escaped back aboard the bus which drove off into the night.

The victim refused medical attention at the scene, though he did suffer moderate bruising.

Anyone with any information regarding the suspect or the crime should contact the New York City Police Department Crime Stoppers Hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS.

The gays react to Michael B. Jordan’s “Sexiest Man Alive” status / Queerty

The gays react to Michael B. Jordan’s “Sexiest Man Alive”

Following in the footsteps of Brad Pitt, Idris Elba, and John Legend, Black Panther star Michael B. Jordan is People’s Sexiest Man Alive for 2020. The magazine announced its pick on November 17, commending the actor both on his chiseled body and his pushes for diversity in front of and behind the camera.

“It’s a cool feeling,” Jordan says of the distinction in the magazine’s cover story. “You know, everybody always made that joke, like, ‘Mike, this is the one thing you’re probably not going to get.’ But it’s a good club to be a part of.”

Related: Michael B. Jordan gives fans heart palpitations with thirstiest share yet

Following the announcement, one Reddit user celebrated Jordan’s SMA status in a Reddit “appreciation post” on the r/askgabybros forum.

“For the first time I completely agree with the guy they chose to be the sexiest man alive,” that user wrote. “Michael B. Jordan is just so damn sexy.”

Others heartily agreed. “I found him to be so hot in Black Panther. Great choice,” one commenter wrote.

Another said, “I’m all for it,” while someone else observed that Jordan is “deffo sexy” and a different guy reported having “a hard time not being hard for every scene he was in in Black Panther.

Black Panther Killmonger GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

One Redditor even said he has followed Jordan through his career highs and lows. “The first time I saw him was in Chronicle, and he impressed me right then!” he wrote. “I’ve loved him [in] everything, even the Fantastic Fourflop.”

Related: “Map Daddy” Steve Kornacki named one of ‘People’ magazine’s sexiest men alive

Others, on the other hand, are relieved that it’s Jordan this year and not a certain past Sexiest Man Alive. “Better than 2017 when it was Blake Shelton’s homophobic basic ass,” one commenter wrote. Another asserted that “nobody agreed with Blake Shelton being chosen.”

And finally, one Reddit user could probably use a crash course in both sports and pop culture: “TBH, I never knew Michael Jordan looked like that and now I have a new crush.”

Michael B Jordan Naacp GIF by BET - Find & Share on GIPHY

You can tell a gay man with a love of bathhouses wrote this movie. We’re ok with that. / Queerty

You can tell a gay man with a love of

Welcome to Screen Gems, our weekend dive into queer and queer-adjacent titles of the past that deserve a watch or a rewatch.

The Steamer: Nightbreed

Clive Barker may have scored a hit with Hellraiser. He made have made his best movie in Lord of Illusions (also one of our pics for Screen Gems). For his most imaginative cinematic experience, however, look no further than Nightbreed, Barker’s horror-fantasy epic with a very troubled production history.

Nightbreed follows the adventure of uber hunk Aaron Boone (Craig Sheffer), a man plagued by visions of a lost city called Midian. He appeals to his psychiatrist Dr. Decker (David Cronenberg, best known as the director of Scanners and The Fly), who suggests Aaron has fallen into psychosis, and that his visions mask his moonlight activities as a masked serial killer. In reality, though, Dr. Decker is the real killer, using Aaron to take the fall for his crimes.

Aaron seeks out Midian, and discovers a real underground city populated by Nightbreed–a society of magical monsters. Like vampires, should a Nightbreed bite a human, the human will become Nightbreed as well…which is exactly what happens to Aaron. From there, Aaron’s girlfriend Lori (Anne Bobby) races Dr. Decker and a monster-hunting priest (Malcolm Smith) to find Aaron and protect Midian from destruction at the hands of religious zealots and sadistic cops.

Like all of Barker’s work, Nightbreed teems with sexuality and thinly-veiled queer characters. The most horrific moment in the film–and actually, the most moving–concerns an obviously gay Nightbreed and his pet terrier. Moreover, the winding, dim and occasionally steamy corridors of Midian feel like a Steamworks maze (Barker has some experience with bathhouses…we’re guessing), while the tribal community of the Breed–complete with physical transformations and overt eroticism–is also an obvious analog for the LGBTQ community. Given that the monsters are the real heroes of the movie, we take that as a compliment.

Nightbreed underwent massive and stupid cuts when it debuted back in 1990. Fortunately, the film has had a proper Director’s Cut restoration on Blu-Ray, which reinserts 40 minutes of deleted footage including an alternate ending. Queer (in every sense of the word), flawed, but always inspired, Nightbreed makes for perfect Halloween viewing.

Streams on Amazon, Peacock, Shudder & iTunes.

He offered a man a cigarette. Then, the stranger raped him. / Queerty

He offered a man a cigarette. Then, the stranger raped

Police in Cape Town, South Africa have arrested a suspect in connection with the brutal rape of a gay man on Saturday night.

The victim, whose name has not been released to the public to protect his identity, stopped to buy cigarettes while on a walk down Cape Town’s Church Street.  A stranger across the street asked if he could share a cigarette, and the victim agreed. After walking a short distance, the stranger then grabbed the victim and forced him into some nearby bushes where he raped him.

The victim returned home crying that night, waking his children and prompting his mother to alert law enforcement.

Related: A bunch of Fox News anchors have just been accused of rape and sexual harassment in damning lawsuit

“He happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time and we fear what these incidents will do to him,” the victim’s mother told South African outlet IOL. “From what he’s telling us it seems as if the perpetrator had been planning this,” she added.

The victim’s mother goes on to say that the family knows and accepts the victim as a gay man, though the family fears for his safety in the homophobic climate of Cape Town. She also says this isn’t the first time he’s been attacked.

“He was almost raped here in Langa [a neighborhood in Cape Town] and at boarding school in Stellenbosch,” the victim’s mother says. “He once arrived here traumatized after he was attacked and almost got raped by a group of men in Stellenbosch.” She also added that he’s experienced insomnia as a result of the Saturday attack.

For the greater Cape Town community, the attack on this victim sends an ominous signal about the safety of the city, and about the nature of sex crimes in general.

“This is the first case we have dealt with and to have such cases where there are calls for the end of gender-based violence and the raping not only of women and children but everyone is upsetting,” said Anele Gqasana of Langa Community Advice Services, a legal and civil rights counseling group based in Cape Town.

At the time of this writing, police have not released the name of the suspect in the case. He remains in custody awaiting his first court appearance.

South Africa is typically labeled the most queer-friendly destination in Africa. LGBTQ people enjoy marriage equality, discrimination protections in housing and employment, adoption rights and can serve in the military. Public opinion surveys, however, paint a more complicated picture of queer acceptance in the nation. A 2015 survey revealed that though a 51% majority of respondents believed LGBTQ people should have the same rights as straight South Africans, a whopping 72% viewed homosexuality as morally wrong.

Leave it to a gay man to write a musical this demented…and this fun / Queerty

Leave it to a gay man to write a musical

 

Welcome to Screen Gems, our weekend dive into queer and queer-adjacent titles of the past that deserve a watch or a rewatch.

The Camp: Little Shop of Horrors

Lyricist Howard Ashman, along with his longtime creative partner composer Alan Menkin, signaled the future they would have as Disney composers ushering in a studio Renaissance with their off-Broadway hit Little Shop of Horrors. Leave it to music impresario David Geffen to go all-in on movie version which, given the stage version’s reliance on camp, shouldn’t work it all.

And yet the movie works extremely well, thanks in large part to the stylized direction of Frank Oz, fresh off his stint as the puppeteer of Yoda, Fozzie Bear and Miss Piggy. Little Shop of Horrors follows nerdy florist Seymour (Rick Moranis) as he discovers a strange venus fly trap-like alien plant. The plant helps revitalize the flower business of his boss Mr. Muchnick (Vincent Gardenia), and helps Seymour capture the eye of his longtime crush, Audrey (Ellen Greene). Little does he know the plant has a taste for human flesh…and a nefarious plan for world conquest.

Goofy as it sounds, Little Shop of Horrors has an odd sincerity about it. Seymour and Audrey’s love story–and the songs that accompany it–have as much passion about them as the tunes from West Side Story. Couple that with wonderful portrayals by Moranis and especially Greene, who gives one of the most underrated performances in musical history. The resulting film has charm, laughs, unforgettable music, courtesy of Ashman’s writing (he penned the script, too), and offers a welcome reprieve from dark times. Right about now, who doesn’t want to be somewhere that’s green?

Streams on Amazon, HBO Max, YouTube, VUDU and Hulu.