Tag: Nancy

Sunday Funday is Celebrating Weddings, Babies, and Nancy Meyers

Sunday Funday is Celebrating Weddings, Babies, and Nancy Meyers

Hello friends and happy Sunday! We’re here once again, back at it to talk about the good things in this world, like babies being born and NEW NANCY MEYERS SPECIALS, and so much more. I’m not gonna ruin it for you, let’s get right on into it.


+ Gorgeous fat femme Chaya Milchtein and her masc partner Morgan got married in the most perfect COVID compliant wedding.

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I was able to peacefully sob my way through my vows because of one incredible plus size woman, @robinechalmers . She’s a day of cordinator and truely was my right hand woman. Robin made sure we had enough water, my veil was steamed, lunch was pucked up, the alter was set up, our glass and wine was purchased and so so many other things. It would have been a wildly hectic day without her. Go follow her! She’s a recently married plus size beauty. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ I wrote my own vows and then read them to my queen. Here’s what I said: ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Morgan, when I met you I didn’t think I’d ever want to marry, because somehow marrying meant I’d lose a piece of myself. With you, that’s not been further than the truth. You’ve breathed a passion into me that I didn’t know could exist. A desire to be content, happy, and fulfilled. I won’t hesitate to proudly call you my love, my wife. Today is our ultimate compromise. A wedding with no one, yet with everyone present. I promise to spend my life compromising with you, finding creative ways to mesh our two unique identities to accomplish things that will make us both happy.  Sometimes I can be a bit much, but you mellow me out. Either way, I promise to make space for you to have your alone time, to not do anything for a bit, and just let you focus on you. And of course, to kick you out of the house to ride your tricycle.  Part of growing with each other has meant learning to travel and explore, vacation, and adventure. I promise you that I’ll always make time to travel with you, planning adventures as often as we can afford them, because life is short, and I want to see the world with you before we leave it. And I’ll try to stay off my phone too.. Above all, I promise to honor and respect you, hold your hand when things get rough, and really listen to you when you speak. Honor and love work side by side, and I promise to keep working every day to earn and keep each of those.  ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 📷 @naturalnerd_designs Hair: @jasmine_shearcanvas 💄@j_jtheemua 👑 + Veil @laine_london 💍 @zalesjewelers 👗👗 @davidsbridal #2wives #queerentinebrides #queers #Marriedlife #gaywedding #interracialcouple

A post shared by Chaya Milchtein (@mechanicshopfemme) on

What’s that about bridal wear being gender neutral? We love to see it!

+ Good news! Your burnt pans are not gone for good! You can fix this!!!!!

+ Schitt’s Creek fans are studying Indigenous history together, you should join!

+ Sarah Paulson has the greatest response for the next time someone asks you about your May/December relationship.

+ TBH, spending the Jewish New Year watching Nora Ephron and eating smoked fish doesn’t sound half bad.

+ How RBG is living on in popular culture, featuring our fave Kate McKinnon.

+ The Connecticut LGBTQ Film Festival runs October 2 to 10 both online and at a drive-in theatre in Manchester! Cute date night idea!!!!

+ Rocky Horror Picture Show and embracing queer expression

+ Catch your first glimpse of The Ammonite at the 32nd Annual New York LGBTQ Film Festival!

+ Wow okay so Father of the Bride Part 3-ish is such a JOY!!!!

+ 50 photos of birds to bring you joy

+ Shanda Leer, a queer drag performer, connects to queer fans through… sports?

+ Temídayo Amay, a nonbinary actor recently won a Helen Hayes for Outstanding Supporting Performer in a Play

+ Batman and Robin is the definition of Camp.

This is what makes Batman and Robin so interesting. It seems to exist largely as a rejection of that vanilla and bland sexuality in Batman Forever. If Batman Forever felt like an uncomfortable embrace of the homophobic paranoia of Seduction of the Innocent, then Batman and Robin plays like a firm rejection of the philosophy of Frederic Wertham. There is something quite compelling in all of this, and Batman and Robin is fascinating to revisit in that context.

+ Queer oral histories are connecting rural queers across the US

+ The sweetest Op-Doc from the NYT about Club Quarantine, the hottest queer club on Zoom.

+ Charlie Martin is thought to be the first transgender racer to compete in 24 Hours of Nürburgring

+ Amanda Nunes has a daughter!

Editor’s Note 9/27/20: An earlier version of this column referred to Chaya Milchtein and Morgan as femme partners.  That reference has since been updated. We apologize for the error.


And that’s all folks. For this week’s good news, and also for my time at Autostraddle. Today’s Sunday Funday is my last post as a writer for Autostraddle dot com, a place I have grown so much at and have great love for. I will miss writing these for you each week, I will miss answering your questions in the A+ Inbox, I’ll even miss moderating your comments. But everything, literally everything comes to an end, and this is the end of my time. I’m going to remember it fondly. I’m leaving with a full heart, and eyes excited about what the future brings for me.

So, like I tell you every week: I love you so much. Do something for yourself this week: read a book you’ve been meaning to read, take a long lay on your couch, get a weighted blanket. Snuggle your pets, snuggle your person(s), wear a danged mask, and believe that everything, bad things and good things, will have an end. And that endings are not bad, they’re just endings. Okay, I really do love you, mean it, bye.❤️🌈✨

Ari

Ari is a 20-something artist and educator. They are a mom to two cats, they love domesticity, ritual, and porch time. They have studied, loved, and learned in CT, Greensboro, NC, and ATX.

Ari has written 322 articles for us.

Breaking Silence by Rosemary Curb and Nancy Manahan – The Lesbrary

Breaking Silence by Rosemary Curb and Nancy Manahan – The

Lesbian Nuns: Breaking Silence

Growing up in a Catholic family and Catholic environment as a lesbian had its challenges. As a young girl, I thought that I would become a religious sister because the idea of living in a community of women seemed much preferable to getting married. You know, back when I thought that getting married automatically included a man. I don’t think it should come as a surprise that lesbian/bi women have been joining religious orders for centuries, finding that life with other women is better than married life with a man.

First published in 1985, Lesbian Nuns: Breaking Silence by Rosemary Curb and Nancy Manahan is a nonfiction anthology with 51 accounts of lesbian nuns and ex-nuns, speaking on the topic about how their sexuality intersects with their vocations.

The success of this book has an interesting story. The Boston archdiocese contacted a news station and appealed for the cancellation of a televised interview with one of the book’s editors. The Boston Globe wrote an article about the censorship, and Lesbian Nuns almost immediately sold out of its first printing with indie lesbian publisher Naiad Press. Shortly after, Warner Books bought the rights for mass-distribution and spread the book far and wide with its second edition. In the book itself, one interviewee said:

Lesbian nuns I know are going to dance! In convents, this book will go around like hotcakes. […] Everybody will read it. Lesbian nuns will be more self-conscious about this book. I can see them dying to get hold of it, but trying not to show too much interest. […] All hell’s going to break loose. Religious communities are going to have to discuss this book. They’re going to have to respond to the reality, and they’ve never had to do that.

One of the contributors to this book might be familiar to some Lesbrary readers. Jeanne Cordova is the author of one of the first chapters, and she is also the author of Kicking the Habit: a Lesbian Nun Story and When We Were Outlaws: A Memoir of Love & Revolution.

The other stories and authors will likely be new to readers, and I think impactful in the way they mirror each other with shared experiences and ideas. Certainly, it was impactful for me with my Catholic background. There were several times that I felt like saying, “Hey! Those are my feelings, too!” There’s so much power for me in connecting with other lesbian women from the past, both distant and not so distant.

“My pain is that I can’t share being a Lesbian with most of these women. Since my Lesbianism is a part of me, they don’t really know me. Yet, if they knew I was a Lesbian, they might know me even less, because of whatever homophobia, stereotypes, or projections they might have. Another source of pain is my Church. I’m not sure what kind of a Catholic I am. I like the Catholic traditions and my personal history. However, I cannot reconcile myself to the Church’s clericalism and sexism.”

I may not personally prefer to capitalize the “l” in lesbian or call my sexuality an ism, but this passage and others truly resonated with me as an ex-Catholic. In fact, regardless of readers’ connections with Catholicism or other religious beliefs or nonbeliefs, I think this book has something for everyone to recognize in themselves.

The book is divided into nine themed sections, including sections on “particular friends”, the relationship between being a lesbian and vows of celibacy and chastity, and women who chose to stay in their religious orders rather than leave. It’s fascinating to read each section and find such similarities and differences in these women’s stories.

There is so much to learn from this book. It is full of first-hand accounts and the personal histories from our lesbian heritage. Catholic or not, religious or not, I highly recommend picking up a copy. Although originally published through an indie publisher, this book has since been reprinted several times and is available widely for anyone interested in exploring the relationship between religion and homosexuality.