Tag: pandemic

Pandemic collaboration ‘Sunday, Someday’ out now – Lesbian.com

Pandemic collaboration ‘Sunday, Someday’ out now – Lesbian.com

Sunday, Someday is a compilation album created by a group of like-minded musicians who began meeting virtually each Sunday after their planned tour together was cancelled due to the pandemic. Alt/punk band Nervus (UK), pop/rock trio Potty Mouth (LA), indie/folk/punk songwriter KOJI (PA), singer/songwriter Solstice Rey (PA) and multimedia artist Full on Mone’t (PA) contributed songs to the album, while crew members who would have been on the tour lent their creative and promotional support. Queer-run independent label Get Better Records will release the album on March 26, 2021.

While the album developed initially to support a member’s fundraising efforts for top surgery, when they reached their fundraising goal, the focus shifted to supporting aftercare expenses and LGBTQI+ youth initiatives. In partnership with Harrisburg, PA coffee roaster Little Amps, Get Better Records has launched a pre-order bundle benefitting the LGBT Center of Central PA’s afterschool program by funding acoustic treatment for youth with sensory needs.

This commitment to supporting queer community members is deeply personal for the group, as the bands involved are comprised primarily of LGBTQI+ people, including members who identify as queer, trans, non-binary, and agender. “We wanted to be a part of creating more access to LGBTQI+ spaces,” says Ally Einbinder (Potty Mouth). “These are resources none of us were fortunate enough to have growing up.”

Living remotely from one another and in relative isolation during the pandemic actually created more space for collaboration. “When pandemic and uprising hit, our instinct was to turn toward one another, to create together, and to support one another,” says KOJI. “Whether we’re doing mutual aid, community care, or we’re out at a protest, we had each other to make sense of the world and what was going on. This project is just an extension of the care that we give to each other and our communities.”

Every aspect of song production and artwork creation for the album was done within the group: Nervus contributed guitars and drums on both Solstice Rey tracks, Em Foster (Nervus) and KOJI mixed and mastered all of the tracks on the album, Abby Weems (Potty Mouth) designed the album art, and Nervus’ manager Megan Rose designed the website for the project. Collaboration, however, extends far beyond album credits, and the power or sum of the project is based on the invisible work and the creativity that takes place within authentic relationships.

“It’s exciting to work on something with people I feel so connected to and understood by,” says Abby Weems (Potty Mouth). “This release is an opportunity for all of us to use our collective passions, skills, and resources to support each other as artists and as people with our own personal needs.”

“This record is a celebration of living in community,” says KOJI. “It’s a project that asks, ‘what world is possible when everyone’s needs are met?’”

(Her)oics’ Camille Beredjick shares pandemic journey – Lesbian.com

(Her)oics’ Camille Beredjick shares pandemic journey – Lesbian.com

Camille BeredjickCamille is a writer and nonprofit marketing manager living in Brooklyn, New York with her wife. Her essays have appeared in BuzzFeed, Narratively, Autostraddle, Catapult, and elsewhere. She’s also the author of Queer Disbelief: Why LGBTQ Equality is an Atheist Issue. Learn more about (Her)oics.

What made you decide to write this piece?
I wrote this piece to help me understand, process, and ultimately accept what I was going through: a recurring eating disorder, a dark depression, and a deep heartache about how to see myself as anything but a failure. I wanted to work through it and to create the opportunity for connection with anyone who might be going through the same thing. Healing is anything but linear. There are peaks, valleys, and devastating spirals, and it can be hard to make sense of those setbacks when you feel like you’ve already come so far. But in writing the essay, I had a reason to think clearly and intentionally about what I was going through and how I could make sense of it moving forward, and I’m proud of what I was able to do.

What is your writing life like? Do you write during the day, after work, etc.?
Writing is not my primary career; I work full-time at a nonprofit, so my writing tends to be confined to nights, weekends, and the occasional lunch break. I tend to go long periods without writing anything, and then I’ll get bursts of ideas that keep me writing for days at a time. Those creative sparks have been much harder to come by since the start of the pandemic, but I’m excited about what I’m writing next and hopeful that it’ll propel me to keep going.

Where do you see your writing going next? Any firm plans or upcoming publications?
I’m working on a memoir about my relationship with my grandmother, a Holocaust survivor and world traveler who shaped my understanding of mental illness, identity, and how we give and receive love. It sounds very heavy, but her life was actually one of joy and lightness; I’m planning to punctuate the chapters with her favorite dirty jokes, for example. No firm plans for publication yet, but I’m looking forward to writing it either way.

Why do you think people should buy and read the anthology?
We’re going to feel the impacts of the pandemic for much longer than any of us realizes. It’s crucial that we not lose sight of how this time has irreparably changed us and our world, especially for those folks already living on the margins: people of color, women, LGBTQ+ people, people with disabilities, and the like. Reading this anthology is another way of connecting to our shared humanity and ensuring we continue to show up for each other.

What is the theme in your piece and how does it come through? Is that an ongoing theme in your work?
Self-reflection and self-acceptance — and the challenges they open up, particularly in the context of mental illness — are ongoing themes in all my work, including this piece. Writing my story down has long been part of my process of coming to terms with who I am, what I look like, and the space I take up in the world. At the same time, I know that countless others are going through the same or, in some cases, much more challenging experiences as I am, and so I hope I addressed themes of compassion and community here, too.

How will your life be different than before the pandemic?
I hope I’ll be a more empathetic and giving person who can pay closer attention to how I can help someone else. And I’ll never again take for granted the things that I’m missing so much now: regularly seeing family, sharing space with loved ones, unmasked hugs.

FIND CAMILLE
camilleberedjick.com
Twitter: @cberedjick
Instagram: @bookstacam

More from Camille: Bylines in BuzzFeed, Catapult, Narratively, Autostraddle, Mic, In These Times, The Daily Dot, Patheos