Tag: PRIDE

Finally got to wear my pride volleys tonight!! 🌈 : actuallesbians

Finally got to wear my pride volleys tonight!! 🌈 :

A place for discussions for and by cis and trans lesbians, bisexual girls, chicks who like chicks, bi-curious folks, dykes, butches, femmes, girls who kiss girls, birls, bois, aces, LGBT allies, and anyone else interested! Our subreddit is named r/actuallesbians because r/lesbians is not really for or by lesbians–it was meant to be a joke. We’re not a militant or exclusive group, so feel free to join up!

Blue’s Clues Says “P Is Full of Pride” with an Array of LGBTQ+ Flags in New Video

Blue's Clues Says "P Is Full of Pride" with an

Nick Jr. children’s show Blue’s Clues & You! has released a new alphabet video for kids celebrating “how each letter of the Alphabet is special!” We see that “P Is Full of Pride” with an array of varied Pride flags, including the trangender, nonbinary, bisexual, pansexual, intersex, genderfluid, asexual, lesbian, and rainbow flags. Watch it here.

Blue's Clues P Is Full of Pride

“Every single letter is unique/And don’t forget/We need all these different sounds/To make our alphabet,” says the song. Some of the letters have clear messages of diversity (“E is for Everyone,” with figures of different skin tones and physical abilities); others are simply fun (“D likes to Dance all day”). We see that “P is full of Pride” right after “O”—but we also see the extended rainbow “P” floating past in some other places, too.

Sammi WS Chan, a designer/animator at Nick Jr. who worked on the images for the video, tweeted today, “The first thing that came to my mind was P is for pride when I got the script. I am so excited that all of ya’ll are as happy as I am! I also did all the letters and graphics for this episode to be as inclusive as possible for Black History Month!”

Bonus fun fact: In 2013, actor Tom Mizer, who played human protagonist Steve in the first national tour of the Blues Clues Live show, fell in love with his understudy, Travis McGhie. The New York Times ran an adorable video in which the pair explain their initially tense relationship and eventual romance.

Watch the video below. Is it too much to ask that they publish this as a book, too?

Unique Pride Week wedding in downtown Los Angeles

A unique Pride Week wedding in downtown Los Angeles. Photography by Sarah Block. Featured on Equally Wed, the leading LGBTQ+ wedding magazine and LGBTQ+ inclusive wedding vendor directory.

JJ and Alex designed their wedding to celebrate their queer experience of love and partnership. “It didn’t feel like the traditional ceremonies accurately depicted our personal queer experiences or the color of our lives,” the couple told Equally Wed. So they invented their own traditions. In collaboration with Priyan Chandraratna of Alfred House Productions, the couple created a Pride Week wedding that was distinct, colorful, and full of joy.

Set in downtown LA, the ceremony featured queer glamor, customized augmented reality features, extensive drag queen performances, and a full Pride store. Instead of the traditional flower arrangements, they opted for bouquets of bright tropical leaves. Mexican churros replaced the traditional cake. Each partner wore exquisite suits in forest green and pearl white.

To other LGBTQ+ couples, they advise: “Figure out the ‘rules.’ Then figure out how to break them. Make your own!”

A unique Pride Week wedding in downtown Los Angeles. Photography by Sarah Block. Featured on Equally Wed, the leading LGBTQ+ wedding magazine and LGBTQ+ inclusive wedding vendor directory.

A unique Pride Week wedding in downtown Los Angeles. Photography by Sarah Block. Featured on Equally Wed, the leading LGBTQ+ wedding magazine and LGBTQ+ inclusive wedding vendor directory.

A unique Pride Week wedding in downtown Los Angeles. Photography by Sarah Block. Featured on Equally Wed, the leading LGBTQ+ wedding magazine and LGBTQ+ inclusive wedding vendor directory.

A unique Pride Week wedding in downtown Los Angeles. Photography by Sarah Block. Featured on Equally Wed, the leading LGBTQ+ wedding magazine and LGBTQ+ inclusive wedding vendor directory.

A unique Pride Week wedding in downtown Los Angeles. Photography by Sarah Block. Featured on Equally Wed, the leading LGBTQ+ wedding magazine and LGBTQ+ inclusive wedding vendor directory.

A unique Pride Week wedding in downtown Los Angeles. Photography by Sarah Block. Featured on Equally Wed, the leading LGBTQ+ wedding magazine and LGBTQ+ inclusive wedding vendor directory.

A unique Pride Week wedding in downtown Los Angeles. Photography by Sarah Block. Featured on Equally Wed, the leading LGBTQ+ wedding magazine and LGBTQ+ inclusive wedding vendor directory.

A unique Pride Week wedding in downtown Los Angeles. Photography by Sarah Block. Featured on Equally Wed, the leading LGBTQ+ wedding magazine and LGBTQ+ inclusive wedding vendor directory.

A unique Pride Week wedding in downtown Los Angeles. Photography by Sarah Block. Featured on Equally Wed, the leading LGBTQ+ wedding magazine and LGBTQ+ inclusive wedding vendor directory.

A unique Pride Week wedding in downtown Los Angeles. Photography by Sarah Block. Featured on Equally Wed, the leading LGBTQ+ wedding magazine and LGBTQ+ inclusive wedding vendor directory.

Unique Pride Week wedding downtown Los Angeles -28

Unique Pride Week wedding downtown Los Angeles -28

A unique Pride Week wedding in downtown Los Angeles. Photography by Sarah Block. Featured on Equally Wed, the leading LGBTQ+ wedding magazine and LGBTQ+ inclusive wedding vendor directory.

A unique Pride Week wedding in downtown Los Angeles. Photography by Sarah Block. Featured on Equally Wed, the leading LGBTQ+ wedding magazine and LGBTQ+ inclusive wedding vendor directory.

A unique Pride Week wedding in downtown Los Angeles. Photography by Sarah Block. Featured on Equally Wed, the leading LGBTQ+ wedding magazine and LGBTQ+ inclusive wedding vendor directory.

VENDORS

Photographer: Sarah Block Photography  
Wedding Ceremony and Reception Venue: Valentine
Florist Company: Alfred House Productions 
Planner: Alfred House Productions 
DJ: Flip Collective
Attire: ASOS 
Catering: Huntington Catering
Photo Booth: Brass Street Photo

LGBTQ+ pride socks for your wedding day

Sock it to me: LGBTQ+ pride socks for your wedding day

Want a comfy sock and not sure what type of rainbow design you might want to sport on your wedding day? Or maybe you want to wear a pair and give your wedding attendants a pair, too. Bombas has a great pride calf sock 4-pack you can snag to give you a few options.

Bombas socks are super comfortable and hold up really well. The calf sock stays nicely in place when pulled up to show the design and with their honeycomb midfoot support, they provide comfort in all the right places. I’m definitely a Bombas fan after I purchased several of the pride socks this year.

And remember, as always with Bombas purchases, one purchased equals one donated to those experiencing homelessness.

Price: $45.60 (Pack of 4)

Bombas.com

Family home draped with Pride flags vandalised by homophobes

homophobic graffiti

A quiet suburban family home decorated with Pride flags and signs was targeted by homophobic vandals who plastered the walls with hateful graffiti.

The house in Barrington, Illinois, had rainbow-decorated trees lining the driveway and an array of positive signs in the backyard, including one that read: “Love and peace over hate.”

Sadly it seems a homophobic thug took that as a challenge, as one morning they were replaced with vile, homophobic slurs.

Barrington local Kiki Angelos spotted the scene as she was out on her morning run. “The first thing I did was notice was the house and its signage, because it had a lot of positive messages in the front yard – which of course, you know, resonates with me,” she told CBS Chicago.

She stopped in disbelief when she saw the anti-LGBT+ graffiti scrawled on the garage, exterior brick walls and side doors of the home.

“It was a stab to the heart,” she said. “[I was] horrified, because it hit me personally. I have two children who identify as queer; a transgender son.”

Angelos raised awareness of the crime on social media as it is such an unusual case in the neighbourhood, and encouraged locals to vote in the upcoming election.

“I will not be silent, and no one should be scared to publicly express who they are in a loving way,” she said. “This community is going to rally around them and support them.”

Police are treating the vandalism as a potential hate crime, and believe it happened sometime overnight on October 17.

They are currently looking through footage on private security cameras to find the culprit, and a $2,500 reward has been offered for anyone who provides information leading to an arrest.

The family whose house was defaced declined to speak to local news, asking for privacy during this time.

Started dating my crush of 2 and a half years on pride day : actuallesbians

Started dating my crush of 2 and a half years

A place for discussions for and by cis and trans lesbians, bisexual girls, chicks who like chicks, bi-curious folks, dykes, butches, femmes, girls who kiss girls, birls, bois, aces, LGBT allies, and anyone else interested! Our subreddit is named r/actuallesbians because r/lesbians is not really for or by lesbians–it was meant to be a joke. We’re not a militant or exclusive group, so feel free to join up!

Slightly late pride podcast : butchlesbians

Slightly late pride podcast : butchlesbians

Hello friends! A little late on this, but I thought you all might appreciate it. One of my favorite podcasts, Ologies, put out a two part neuroendocrinology episode for pride month. The guest is a nonbinary scientist, and they go into a lot about gender nonconformity, sexuality, and brain development. It’s a really cool episode if you have the chance to listen!

https://play.google.com/music/m/Dioauvxohslk354gzvvpbtoaqwa?t=Neuroendocrinology_SEX_GENDER_Part_1_with_Daniel_Pfau_-_Ologies_with_Alie_Ward

My First Pride Was About Building My Queer Future and Mourning a Past I’ll Always Long For

My First Pride Was About Building My Queer Future and

Four days after my mom’s funeral and eleven after her death, I went to my very first pride parade. I spent the night with one of my best friends (who is also queer) to have a mini getaway from all the turmoil. The day of the parade, we spent the morning and early afternoon getting ready and choosing our outfits, getting ready with the rest of our queer friends over FaceTime. My friend’s mom dropped us off a couple blocks away from the actual parade. We piled out of the car and poured into the streets with the rest of the crowd, instantly swept into the pulsating party. Queer men were wearing crop tops and shorts while holding hands with their partners. Queer women strolled across the street, limbs interwoven and eyes gazing upon their partners lovingly. Large groups of friends chatted excitedly. My ears were happily set abuzz as I overheard non-binary and gender non-conforming people correcting or introducing others to their pronouns, and receiving kind responses. As soon as I set foot in the parade, multiple rainbow-colored beads were adorned across my neck. A few moments later, I was pulled into a warm embrace of free hugs from volunteers, the first of many which were set up all along the festivities.

I walked around downtown staring in awe at a gazillion rainbow flags and the most beautiful and most queer faces I’d ever laid eyes on. A mix of many emotions flushed through my mind — relaxed, energized, comfortable, overwhelmed, safe, fun, celebratory, defiant, and most of all affirmed. I was in the midst of thousands of people and I wasn’t thinking about whether they were going to accept me for who I was. It was like being around a group of friends that I haven’t gotten to know yet. My friend and I made our way to the main stage as the vocal stylings of various pop stars their way into my eardrums. The two of us ended up standing next to a group of butch and stud lesbians that danced with my friends and I, one of which I cheered on as she got twerked on by my friend. We backed away from the main stage, and a group of drag queens flashed me a reassuring smile and head nod. As the sun dimmed and the moon began to show its face, we saw old classmates and friends who congratulated me on this milestone. We closed out the night, by grabbing some turkey legs from one of the various food trucks available. As we walked back and waited for my mom’s friend, my eyes found their way to a group of friends dressed up in BDSM attire. My eyes made their way up to the overhanging street sign which read, “Stonewall.” I was home.

My mom passed away in August of 2019. Two months after my high school graduation; one month before my nineteenth birthday; two weeks before I began my first semester of college, four days before that pride parade. She had stage two breast cancer, but was cancer-free thanks to a double mastectomy. Her doctors had suggested preventative chemo as a precautionary measure. My mom wasn’t feeling very well one morning and called in sick to work. A couple of hours later on her way back to bed she laid down on the floor. ‘’I don’t know what’s going on with me today, sweetie.’’ She asked me to let her lay down on her floor for a few minutes before helping her back into bed. I thought the request was odd, but obeyed. I went to go help her up five minutes later and noticed she was shaking uncontrollably, mouth open, unable to speak, and her eyes bleeding and fixated on me. I called 911 and started to do compressions. 45 minutes later, when the paramedics came down the steps of my house to tell me that despite their best efforts, my mom had passed away, I felt as though that my entire world was crashing down at lightning speed. I had no parents left. My dad had passed away ten years earlier. 3827 days. Or ten years, five months, 25 days apart. But who’s counting.

I was no longer anyone’s baby girl. No one’s pumpkin. As my mom drew her last breath, my safety net exited through her lungs, and my sense of security vanished with the very last rise and fall of her chest. My mother took our language. Our inside jokes. Our songs. Stories and anecdotes about my adolescent and her own that became running gags for years to come. We built a language together. A special rhythm with its own ebbs and flows. A rhythm that showed me a reflection of a young woman who was capable and strong. I feel hollow in her absence. Without the person that brought me into this world, I do not know if I have a place in it. No one will ever love me unconditionally and only ask for my own happiness in return. I will never put that pure sparkle in anyone’s eye again.

When you lose a parent in your teens, you immediately imagine all the milestones you’ll hit without them: graduation, a first job, first apartment or house, a wedding. Every day since the day my parents died, I am one day further away from them. It enrages me that I will have to recycle my childhood and teenage years like a broken record for the rest of my life in order to have my parents present in my life. Most people are saddened by the ending of their adolescence because adulthood brings responsibility. I am sad because that is where my parents are frozen for eternity. On the bright side, I’m also one day closer to my most authentic and most queer self. I could finally consider getting the bisexual bob™. But even that’s a double double edged sword. I started to realize that at some point, as years of my life went on… my parents might not even recognize me anymore, because of who I’d become.

I am queer. I identify as both bisexual and pansexual. This is something that I’ve always known about myself since the age of five, thanks to a friend from kindergarten named Jasmine who I obsessively slept next to during nap time and played with during recess — what I realize now was a crush — to the beautiful dentist assistants from my dentist office that made my heart palpate in my chest. Plus, of course, my very first and most beloved celebrity crush… Tessa Thompson, whom I first fell in love with while watching her play a badass 1930’s masculine-of-center lesbian on an episode of Cold Case.

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In the years to follow, there would a cycle of taking “Am I gay or bisexual” quizzes, reading Autostraddle, and watching The L Word and Pariah on illegal sites before quickly deleting my search history.

I would discuss my opinion on topics concerning the LGBT community with my mom but always making sure to distinguish myself as an ally. She would often say that I was “changing her mind about gay people” and seemed to actually be unlearning her homophobia and transphobia.

My mom and I were inseparable from the moment I was born. That only intensified after my dad’s death. We did almost everything together, FaceTiming each other throughout the day when we were separated during work and school, having heartfelt discussions about our respective days and knowing that neither of us would be judgmental. We shared clothes, cooked together, had dance parties to my curated playlist as we drove during road trips or to the grocery store. She had this infectious playfulness, style, and spunk that drew everyone to her. I always knew that my mom and our home was a consistent safety net where I could let my burdens go and be myself.

But I will never know what her stance would’ve been had it been her own daughter. So often we hear stories about struggling to be queer because immediate family is unaccepting, especially in communities of color. So much about blackness across the diaspora, but especially for us as African-Americans, is about community. Being in close contact or proximity with family members other just your nuclear family, having aunties and uncles that aren’t blood relation, coming together and screaming at the top of our lungs at graduations. The flip side of that close-knit community is that when you’re queer, you’re often collectively discarded. The pain is just as difficult when you’ll never truly know what the outcome would be had they known.

I often have dreams about reuniting with my parents and bringing them up to speed with what has gone on in my life. My mom welcomes me with open arms and holds me close with one of her warm and maternal hugs. She coos, ‘’There’s my baby girl.’’ My dad, in his true fashion, is more laid back but just as excited to see me, quietly smiling and nodding before pulling me in for a hug of his own. I tell them about my writing, my friends, and therapy. They smile proudly and are engrossed in everything I have to say. Then I bring up or introduce them to a non-cishet male partner and their expressions visibly morph into disappointment. In other dreams, they walk right past me and don’t recognize me at all. I wake up each time discouraged and disoriented. On top of the expected layer of grief that washes over me, there’s an extra layer that is inevitable as a queer person: disguising your true self or burying any reminiscence of self for acceptance, and having the experiences of self-discovery customary to cishet teenagers as a young adult.

Those feelings are ever-present. At that pride parade, I felt relaxed and affirmed walking the streets with my queer friends, as I wore my blue, purple, and pink beads, watched a beautiful group of butches and drag queens in awe as they smiled at me, a baby gay, knowing. It hit me, as I watched a vogue competition on the main stage of the parade. How would my parents feel right now if they knew I was here? Would they come to accept it in time? My exuberance faded. In that moment I felt the happiest I’d honestly ever been, and neither of them would ever experience this with me. They not only lost the opportunity to see me into adulthood, but to see me in my totality.

This knot in my stomach came again as I finally attended a meeting for my college’s pride alliance club. I was welcomed in and accepted instantly; everyone shared their pronouns openly. There was no judgement. I hung out with them after the club meeting ended. We exchanged social handles and phone numbers. As I ordered an Uber home, I felt salty tears running down my cheeks. I was standing in the same part of campus that I walked with my mom a couple of months earlier as she helped me sign up for classes. Where she had shared her excitement about watching me embark on this next chapter. Little did she know what this next chapter would include.

Two hundred and four days after my mom’s death, I met with the program associate of my local pride organization. As we sat in a cafe, I opened up to her about realizing I was not straight at five, consuming queer media in secret, and now finely trying to venture out to create chosen family and queer community after my parents (particularly my mothers) passing. I discussed my fears about moving through the world as an out black queer person means. We locked eyes. She listened to me intently; I asked her about her journey. She explained that like me, she at one point feared being out, but also like me, began to explore in her freshman year of college. She understood the struggles I was facing as a black queer femme, ressurred me that I would find my tribe, and that she’d be there along the way.

A couple of days later, I spoke about the meeting with my wellness coach, another black queer femme. She echoed the same excitement, told me how proud she was for taking the leap to find queer activites. As looked into her eyes and thought about all the black queer femmes I’d connected with in the wake of this tragedy, I felt genuine love and support, acknowledgement and acceptance for all that I am. That moment brought one of my favorite Alice Walker quotes to mind: ‘’I think mothers and daughters are meant to give birth to each other, over and over; that is why our challenges to each other are so fierce; that is why, when love and trust have not been too badly blemished or destroyed, the teaching and learning one from the other is so indelible and bittersweet. We daughters must risk losing the only love we instinctively feel we can’t live without in order to be who we are, and I am convinced this sends a message to our mothers to break their own chains, though they may be anchored in prehistory and attached to their own great grandmothers’ hearts.’’

I have slowly started to build a new home. I will forever long for and crave the one I lost, but I must find the strength within myself to be myself, without longing for a definitive answer from the person I most want to make proud, because she has left this realm. I have to find some kind of comfort in this life without either of them, that will involve building a queer future and striving for a better world. A queer world for myself and my fellow black and brown queer people. Fighting for health care, anti-policing, housing, mutual aid, labor with dignity, and resisting state sanctioned violence. Speaking out against the systems that harm and kill queer Black people, people of color, and the most vulnerable in our community. While I hope to live a life alongside a chosen family, have a partner (that may not be a cishet man), engrave tattoos and piercings on my body that they may have not understood, and make art that may have confused them. It will be a world that won’t involve my parents. At some point, I will be okay with that.

Republican Party renews attacks on us just in time for pride

Republican Party renews attacks on us just in time for

“Gays for Trump” at rally in Lynden, Washington, on Saturday, May 7 (via NPR)

The Republican National Convention has announced its 2020 platform will feature renewed opposition to marriage equality, LGBTQ rights, and will endorse conversion therapy.

The New York Times reports that the tone-deaf announcement (which comes during pride month and during renewed queer activism in solidarity with Black Lives Matter) is a move to repackage the party’s 2016 platform as new, rather than adopting fresh positions. The move also comes at a time when the RNC has tried to promote Trump as the most pro-queer President in history.

The Times reports “The 2016 platform that is being renewed was the result of messy debates in Cleveland, the host city of the Republican convention four years ago, during which a group of renegade delegates tried but failed to strip out language opposing gay marriage and condoning conversion therapy for L.G.B.T.Q. youths.”

“The platform made a steadfast case against same-sex marriage and called for a constitutional amendment overturning the 2015 Supreme Court decision that struck down laws defining marriage between one man and one woman,” the Times also notes. “And it blames ‘the current President’ for seeking to expand workplace protections to include L.G.B.T.Q. people.”

via Queerty

Biden recognizes 50th anniversary of LGBTQ Pride Month

Biden recognizes 50th anniversary of LGBTQ Pride Month

Joe Biden issued a statement on June 1 recognizing Pride Month, saying “much work remains” to advance LGBTQ people despite the progress made after the first Pride 50 years ago in memorial of the Stonewall riots.

“Despite our progress, much work remains,” Biden wrote. “As our nation grapples with the uncomfortable truths of systemic racism, a devastating pandemic that’s claimed more than 100,000 lives in the United States and left more than 40 million people filing for unemployment, and a president that’s waged an all-out assault on the rights of our most vulnerable, including LGBTQ+ people, we are reminded of why those first brave souls took to the streets to march 50 years ago.

“Pride has come to be recognized as a global movement of love, self-expression, and community — resilient in the face of oppression and fear and hopeful for a better future,” Biden wrote. “This month, let us recommit to those principles of Pride and remain steadfast in the fight for justice and equality.”

Biden also invoked the memories of LGBTQ activists who have died in recent weeks: Larry Kramer, a gay rights pioneer and AIDS activist who founded ACT Up; Aimee Stephens, a transgender plaintiff in lawsuit before the Supreme Court that will decide whether federal civil rights law applies to LGBTQ people; and Lorena Borjas, a transgender immigrant activist.

Biden also cites the anti-LGBTQ policies of the Trump administration, such as the transgender military ban, as well as condemning Trump and Vice President Mike Pence for having “given safe harbor to white supremacists and other forms of hate.”

In contrast, Biden expresses commitment to LGBTQ legislation known as the Equality Act pending before Congress and says he’ll take “swift action to reverse” the Trump administration’s anti-LGBTQ policies.

Last week, the White House issued five proclamations from Trump designating June as Great Outdoors Month, African-American Music Appreciation Month, National Homeownership Month, National Ocean Month and National Caribbean-American Heritage Month, but nothing on Pride Month.

via Washington Blade