Tag: roles

Wentworth Miller on why it’s better to use gay actors for gay roles / Queerty

Wentworth Miller on why it’s better to use gay actors

Wentworth Miller in Prison Break
Wentworth Miller in Prison Break (Photo: Fox)

Actor Wentworth Miller has spoken further about the importance of gay representation on screen. Two weeks ago, Miller – who came out as gay in 2013 – took to Instagram to inform fans that he had no plans to return for a mooted sixth season of Prison Break, saying he only wished to play gay characters from now on.

Yesterday, Miller posted an Instagram video of himself kissing the actor Russell Tovey. The two men played love interests Leo Snart/Captain Cold and Ray Tyrrell on the DC show, The Flash, in 2017.

In the accompanying caption, Miller spoke about the power of having two gay actors to play gay superheroes and kiss on screen. He also went on to highlight one of the benefits of casting a gay actor.

Related: Russell Tovey and Wentworth Miller share passionate kiss

“Leo. The powers-that-be willed him into existence and I was grateful. He didn’t have to be gay but the writers wrote that shit. So we got 2 gay actors playing 2 gay superheroes kissing onscreen… Felt like a moment.

He went on to say that when he read the script, he felt it needed tweaking.

“Where Leo tells Mick and Sara he’s marrying Ray, his original line was like, ‘I just want something normal…’ Gays. Just like us. Except me? I’m not getting married. I didn’t want Leo framing marriage as ‘normal’ for folks (kids) watching. It’s not. It’s homonormative. A ton of queer folks are living full/content lives outside the marriage construct. That line became, ‘I’m looking for a new kind of adventure’ (or some such).”

Miller went on to ask, “Would a straight actor playing Leo push for that change? Have that conversation with the (straight) writers and (straight) director? Maybe. I did bec I had to. It reflects my lived experience. I’m having those conversations 24-7. Not just on set.

“I should note I had the weight – and will – to push for rewrites. Not every actor does. #privilege.”

He says he also questioned another part of the script.

“Last tweak: The sc where Leo and Ray argue while Ray changes. The first draft called for me to ‘blush and turn away’ at the sight of a shirtless Ray. Hello. They’re lovers. Pretty sure it was the person who wrote that sc who wanted to blush and turn away.”

A day earlier, Miller also returned to the issue of him not rejoining Prison Break. Since his first announcement a couple of weeks ago, some fans have speculated that the show’s creators might tempt him back by making his character, Michael Schofield, gay.

Related: Wentworth Miller quits Prison Break, doesn’t “want to play straight characters”

Miller appeared to pour cold water on this idea. He also dismissed further speculation that Scofield might enter into any sort of relationship with the character T-Bag, who is shown having sex with men in prison but is also a racist, pedophile, murderer, and rapist. Millers suggests T-Bag should not be considered gay representation.

“Forgive me,” said Miller on Instagram. “I need to put my finger on something. In and around the ‘reveal’ I’m gay IRL, don’t wish to play straight parts etc., I saw dozens of comments suggesting Michael leave Sara for T-bag. Or that T-bag will be ‘looking’ for Michael/me.

“Is it possible, to some folks, T-Bag = “gay” rep on PB? Maybe the ONLY rep on TV in their part of the world? Forget the homophobes + zealots (bec fuck them) – for the queer kids, the queer adults who will never come out bec coming out = death in their part of the world… is T-bag the best they can expect?”

He went on to say that Hollywood sends out messages to viewers, whether intentional or not, which is why he believes so strongly about bringing authentic LGBTQ representation to the screen.

“Stories matter. Balanced, responsible storytelling matters. You never know who’s watching. Or where.”

Matt Bomer says coming out as gay cost him TV and film roles

Matt Bomer The Boys in the Band

Matt Bomer has revealed that coming out as gay cost him film and television roles – but he said that the trade-off was ultimately worth it.

The American Horror Story star came out publicly as gay in 2012 in the best possible way — by thanking his husband while accepting an award for his HIV/AIDS activism.

But Bomer has now revealed that his simple act of courage cost him roles in film and television in the years that followed.

Speaking to Attitude magazine, Bomer said there is a “trade-off” for LGBT+ people coming out in the public eye.

“We’re living in a day and age where there are actors and athletes and public figures who are openly gay and have been unafraid to acknowledge that, but without a question, there’s a trade-off, in my experience,” he said.

“I came out at a time when it was very risky to do so – I had a studio film that was about to premiere, and a television series coming out. But to me it was more important to be my almost authentic self, both for my family, and for myself.”

He continued: “I wasn’t trying to be a role model, nor am I now, but I thought if it could help just one person, then it would be worth it.

“But to say that didn’t cost me certain things in my career would be a lie. It did. To me that trade-off was worth it. But it hasn’t been some fairy tale — no pun intended.”

Matt Bomer set to star in The Boys in the Band.

The actor made his comments during an interview ahead of the release of a Ryan Murphy adaptation of acclaimed queer play The Boys in the Band, written by the late Mart Crowley. 

The film, slated for release on Netflix September 30, is directed by Joe Mantello, and stars Jim Parsons, Zachary Quinto and Andrew Rannells alongside Bomer.

In the same interview, Quinto lashed out at the Trump administration for its “patriarchal white male, heterosexual, homophobic, transphobic mentality”.

“Persecution still exists. It has shifted slightly into different factions of our community. With increased trans visibility – huge step forward in the last five or 10 years – there’s come increased violence against trans people – particularly Black, trans women, and trans women of colour,” Quinto added.

“As gay white men, maybe our challenges have diminished slightly, but we owe it to one another to stand up on behalf of each other. Violence against one of us is violence against all of us.”

The Boys in the Band debuted off-Broadway in 1968 and quickly went on to become a seminal play for the LGBT+ community.

The groundbreaking play tells the story of a group of gay men gathering for a birthday party in New York City. It debuted into a world in which LGBT+ people had not yet received anything close to mainstream representation, and it broke new ground in its depiction of queer lifestyles.

The upcoming Netflix adaptation, produced by Murphy, will reunite the cast of an acclaimed 2018 Broadway revival of the play.