Tag: Silence

‘Surviving the Silence’ – Lesbian.com

‘Surviving the Silence’ – Lesbian.com

The festivities start this Thursday, September 24. We hope you will join us!

Details are on our website: SurvivingtheSilence.com and also listed below.

Opening Night Events on Thursday, September 24:

6:30pm EDT / 3:30pm PDT: Welcome on Out on Film’s Facebook page.

7:00pm EDT / 4:00pm PDT: Virtual Watch Party (Buy tickets here)

8:30pm EDT / 5:30 PDT: Live Q&A with Col. Patsy Thompson, Barbara Brass, Col. Margarethe Cammermeyer, 22nd Army Sec. Eric Fanning, and filmmaker Cindy L. Abel (Included with film screening ticket).

Buying a ticket in advance will make life easier when audiences click to watch at 7:00pm EDT / 4:00pm PDT. 😀

Here are links to a couple recent articles about us and our film:
https://www.ajc.com/life/out-on-film-is-in-home-this-year/B5WJ4OXH2BGO5ITLO55SG4ACK4/
https://www.jweekly.com/2020/09/16/new-doc-tells-story-of-sacramento-couples-forbidden-gay-military-romance/

Tags: 22nd Army Sec. Eric Fanning, Barbara Brass, Cindy L. Abel, Col. Margarethe Cammermeyer, Col. Patsy Thompson, Surviving the Silence

Posted & filed under Entertainment.

Breaking Silence by Rosemary Curb and Nancy Manahan – The Lesbrary

Breaking Silence by Rosemary Curb and Nancy Manahan – The

Lesbian Nuns: Breaking Silence

Growing up in a Catholic family and Catholic environment as a lesbian had its challenges. As a young girl, I thought that I would become a religious sister because the idea of living in a community of women seemed much preferable to getting married. You know, back when I thought that getting married automatically included a man. I don’t think it should come as a surprise that lesbian/bi women have been joining religious orders for centuries, finding that life with other women is better than married life with a man.

First published in 1985, Lesbian Nuns: Breaking Silence by Rosemary Curb and Nancy Manahan is a nonfiction anthology with 51 accounts of lesbian nuns and ex-nuns, speaking on the topic about how their sexuality intersects with their vocations.

The success of this book has an interesting story. The Boston archdiocese contacted a news station and appealed for the cancellation of a televised interview with one of the book’s editors. The Boston Globe wrote an article about the censorship, and Lesbian Nuns almost immediately sold out of its first printing with indie lesbian publisher Naiad Press. Shortly after, Warner Books bought the rights for mass-distribution and spread the book far and wide with its second edition. In the book itself, one interviewee said:

Lesbian nuns I know are going to dance! In convents, this book will go around like hotcakes. […] Everybody will read it. Lesbian nuns will be more self-conscious about this book. I can see them dying to get hold of it, but trying not to show too much interest. […] All hell’s going to break loose. Religious communities are going to have to discuss this book. They’re going to have to respond to the reality, and they’ve never had to do that.

One of the contributors to this book might be familiar to some Lesbrary readers. Jeanne Cordova is the author of one of the first chapters, and she is also the author of Kicking the Habit: a Lesbian Nun Story and When We Were Outlaws: A Memoir of Love & Revolution.

The other stories and authors will likely be new to readers, and I think impactful in the way they mirror each other with shared experiences and ideas. Certainly, it was impactful for me with my Catholic background. There were several times that I felt like saying, “Hey! Those are my feelings, too!” There’s so much power for me in connecting with other lesbian women from the past, both distant and not so distant.

“My pain is that I can’t share being a Lesbian with most of these women. Since my Lesbianism is a part of me, they don’t really know me. Yet, if they knew I was a Lesbian, they might know me even less, because of whatever homophobia, stereotypes, or projections they might have. Another source of pain is my Church. I’m not sure what kind of a Catholic I am. I like the Catholic traditions and my personal history. However, I cannot reconcile myself to the Church’s clericalism and sexism.”

I may not personally prefer to capitalize the “l” in lesbian or call my sexuality an ism, but this passage and others truly resonated with me as an ex-Catholic. In fact, regardless of readers’ connections with Catholicism or other religious beliefs or nonbeliefs, I think this book has something for everyone to recognize in themselves.

The book is divided into nine themed sections, including sections on “particular friends”, the relationship between being a lesbian and vows of celibacy and chastity, and women who chose to stay in their religious orders rather than leave. It’s fascinating to read each section and find such similarities and differences in these women’s stories.

There is so much to learn from this book. It is full of first-hand accounts and the personal histories from our lesbian heritage. Catholic or not, religious or not, I highly recommend picking up a copy. Although originally published through an indie publisher, this book has since been reprinted several times and is available widely for anyone interested in exploring the relationship between religion and homosexuality.

GLSEN Day of Silence – Proud Parenting

GLSEN Day of Silence - Proud Parenting

The GLSEN Day of Silence is a national student-led demonstration where LGBTQ students and allies all around the country take a vow of silence to protest the harmful effects of harassment and discrimination of LGBTQ people in schools.

This effort was started in the mid 90’s by two college students but since then the Day of Silence has expanded to reach hundreds of thousands of students each year. Every April, students go through the school day without speaking, ending the day with Breaking the Silence rallies and events to share their experiences during the protest and bring attention to ways their schools and communities can become more inclusive. Now due to the unusual circumstances, GLSEN has decided to go virtual.

As a young ally I think that this is an amazing event to rally against the violence seen in schools around the world that target LGBTQ+ students. I myself will be taking part in this day and hope that many others will consider it.

This year we are honoring the 25th anniversary of Day of Silence on Friday, April 24, 2020. Learn more about this incredible event.