Tag: Thomas

Golf star Justin Thomas apologises for saying homophobic slur at Sentry

Justin Thomas

Justin Thomas of the United States reacts on the 18th green during the third round of the Sentry Tournament Of Champions at the Kapalua Plantation Course on 9 January, 2021 in Kapalua, Hawaii. (Getty/ Cliff Hawkins)

American golf star and world number three Justin Thomas has been forced to apologise after blurting out a homophobic slur live on air at the Sentry Tournament of Champions.

On Saturday (9 January), during the third round of the Sentry Tournament of Champions in Hawaii, Thomas missed a five-foot putt on the fourth hole.

As he missed, the television microphone picked up his voice as he muttered: “Faggot.”

Sports Media LGBT+, a network group that “advocates for inclusion in both our own industry and across sport in general”, responded to the clip on social media.

The organisation wrote on Twitter: “The casual use of anti-gay language in sports – usually without homophobic intent – is a major reason why many athletes and coaches who are LGBT+ don’t feel they would be made welcome if they came out.” 

Justin Thomas described his homophobic outburst as “terrible”

Afterwards, Justin Thomas, 27, apologised for the homophobic slur while speaking to Golf Channel.

According to Reuters, he said: “There’s just no excuse. There’s absolutely no reason for me to say anything like that. It’s terrible. It’s not the kind of person that I am.”

“I need to do better,” he added. “I deeply apologise to anyone and everybody who I offended and I’ll be better because of it.”

He also told BBC Sport: “It’s inexcusable… I’m an adult. I’m a grown man, there’s absolutely no reason for me to say anything like that. It’s terrible. I’m extremely embarrassed.

“It’s not who I am, it’s not the kind of person that I am or anything that I do. Unfortunately, I did it and I have to own up to it and I’m very apologetic.”

But some golf fans on social media were hesitant to accept his apology, with one writing: “Justin Thomas apologised for GETTING CAUGHT using a homophobic slur.

“No way was it the first time just lack of crowd noise to hide it this time!”

The PGA Tour said in a statement: “As he expressed after his round, we agree that Justin’s comment was unacceptable.”

Footballer Thomas Beattie doesn’t want any gay athlete or fan to feel alone / Queerty

Footballer Thomas Beattie doesn’t want any gay athlete or fan

This profile is part of Queerty’s 2020 Out For Good series, recognizing public figures who’ve had the courage to come out and make a difference in the past year, in celebration of National Coming Out Day on October 11.

Name: Thomas Beattie, 34

Bio: A native of East Yorkshire, England, Beattie trained with the Hull City youth academy before playing professional football across three continents — playing for London City FC, Ottawa Fury FC, and Singapore’s Warriors FC, among other teams.

An injury took Beattie out of the game in 2015, but he has since found a second calling as an entrepreneur and a founder of Ovvy, Roquepress, Hygiene Hub, and Guide Visuals.

Coming Out: Beattie came out as gay on Instagram and in an ESPN interview in June. “It’s time to share something very personal to me,” he wrote in his Instagram post. “It’s easier to sit in silence, but the real challenge is to speak up, and for me, it’s time live my truth and hopefully affect change in some way. I am a brother, son, friend and I’m gay. It took me a long time to accept who I am, and I hope it is a little easier for the next generation. Thank you to everyone who has supported me through this process and the journey to come, I appreciate you.”

Finding His Flock: In a follow-up interview with Advocate, Beattie said he wanted to pave the way for gay athletes and gay sports fans. “Mentally there are often many challenges associated with self acceptance and it can be a huge weight to carry,” he said. “I hope to represent the LGBTQ+ community to the best of my ability, and I think the more people involved in sport who are from that community, the more gay sports fans will resonate and feel connected. Being gay can often leave you feeling lonely and singled out, but hopefully as more players come out, there will be more representation at the professional level of sport.”

Words of Wisdom:

“To anyone struggling with identity reading this story, I want you to realize that the one specific moment you can learn to embrace and truly understand who you are, that’s the moment you become powerful. I ask that you be kind to yourself because the thoughts you speak to yourself become words and words become actions. Once I learned that, I became the best possible version of Thomas Beattie. I hope my story can resonate with you so you know that you are not alone, and one day in time you will live in a world where these two environments can co-exist. I hope we eventually get to a space where you don’t have to sacrifice who you are to become an athlete.” – Thomas Beattie, as told to ESPN

Thais reviews Catherine House by Elisabeth Thomas – The Lesbrary

Susan reviews The Lady’s Guide to Celestial Mechanics by Olivia

Catherine House by Elisabeth Thomas

I loved this book. I loved it so much that I immediately binned the other review I had planned for this month, even though I do not have the slightest idea of how to properly describe and criticize this book. I know a lot of people hated Catherine House, so I wanted to make this clear from the get go—I loved this book.

I tend to love experimental works of fiction and Catherine House is very much that. It mixes gothic horror and the campus novel genre to tell a story better suited for a thriller, and it does so by using a structure that is unashamedly literary, heavy in atmosphere and imagery that drips with details and repetition of motifs.

There is still plenty of plot, even some elements that put the book in the speculative fiction category, but Catherine House is the story of a young college girl still in the grip of depression and guilt for falling with the wrong crowd and spiraling through a couple of neglected years that led to trauma and self-loathing, and you will get exactly that from the narration.

Ines is depressed and at times (and for long stretches of time at that), the book follows her depression, her inability to pull herself out of her fog, to follow up on her curiosity, to even be alarmed at the sinister undercurrent that seems surround this place to which she has just committed three years of her life. And that is a hefty commitment.

Because Catherine House is not just any fictional elite college, it is a place that demands its students distance themselves from everyone in their lives, including their past selves. Like a cult, Catherine House demands that each student gives themselves to the school completely, and we start a story with the new class of students that has done just that arriving at their new, secretive home.

Some of them are already a bit cautious, but for the most part, students are seduced into this free, top-tier institution that promises them success in life, if they surrender every part of themselves to it.

Even to me, it felt seductive. I tend to avoid any media that has elements of horror, because I struggle with insomnia as it is. I was reluctant to pick this up, but the beautiful prose lured me in, and soon I was moving deeper and deeper into the house with Ines, wondering with her what ‘plasm’ was and why it had so many of her classmates so obsessed, getting horrified with her by the creepy meditations the school imposed. But like Ines, I also felt drawn to School Director Viktória, even as I could tell from the start that she was evil.

Viktória might have actually been the most seductive part of all. Ines is bisexual and that is established early on in the narrative, so her obsession with the beautiful, mysterious older woman who runs Catherine House felt sexual at first. Ines did not yearn for Viktória quite that way, but her eyes still follow Viktória whenever she is around, keeping herself apart from everything and overly involved with everyone at the same time. In a room full of people, Ines only ever has eyes for Viktória, for every minute detail of her appearance and demeanor.

It is not romantic, but Ines’ gaze feels desire. She can’t stop drinking in Viktória, basking in her presence.

Viktória, for her part, seems all too happy to cast herself as nurturing and maternal, but also seems to display a predatory interest for Ines, never crossing the line, but often making sure she gets Ines alone and disarms her with long talks, probing questions into her interests, lingering touches.

At the end, I couldn’t help but feel more than allured by the school, Ines was allured by Viktória, and that the horror of the book lies primarily with this deeply dysfunctional relationship.

While Ines has a long-term relationship with one of male characters, Theo, even that felt like tethered to Viktória—Viktória tells her to be social, to immerse herself in the school, to make deep ties that anchor her to Catherine and Ines does.

Other than her friendships with her roommate Baby and with another young black woman called Yaya, all of Ines’ actions seem performative even to herself, a way to show that she’s becoming good, that she’s becoming worthy.

No matter how sinister the school got, I found it impossible to pull away and I think the main reason for that were all those entangled, complicated relationships between women (and mostly women of color at that).

I was so entranced by the relationships in the story that it didn’t bother me very much that the aspects of the book that tended a bit towards science fiction were never fleshed out or that a lot of the later reveals in the book are a bit predictable. I also imagine some people might have had problems with the pace of the story, but like I said before, I expected literary, experimental, with small touches of horror, and Catherine House delivers on that.

If you want a satisfactory plot with clear resolutions, this might not be the book for you, but if you are craving something moody, with lots of description of winter in rural Pennsylvania and complex (and sometimes infuriating) female characters, I think you will like this.