Tag: tribute

Miles Morales pays touching tribute to World AIDS Day

Spider-Man: Miles Morales pays touching tribute to World AIDS Day

As Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales hits the stores, eagle-eyed players have noticed a subtle yet touching tribute to World AIDS day hidden in the game.

The new game for Playstation 4 and 5 follows web-slinging teen hero Miles Morales, who’s the very first Black character to don the Spidey costume.

The latest adventure in the Spider-Man universe is packed full of clever details that bring Marvel’s New York City to life – including one very important flash of red on a jacket lapel.

The refreshing little touch of an AIDS ribbon didn’t go unnoticed by gay video game director Simon Smith, who shared a screenshot with his followers on Twitter.

“Awesome to see a World AIDS Day red ribbon featured on the Miles Morales game title screen,” he said. “The game is set in NYC around Christmas so this makes sense as World AIDS Day is 1 December.”

It’s not the game’s only nod to inclusivity.

Miles’ Afro-Latino culture is placed the heart of the story, with the young Spider-Man often heard speaking Spanglish with his Puerto Rican mother. His Black heritage is also acknowledged through the prominent hip-hop music interwoven through the game.

He’s accompanied by a refreshingly diverse cast, including his best friend Ganke Lee, who is Korean, while other major characters like The Tinkerer and The Prowler are both Black. There’s also a deaf character introduced partway through the story.

And as a special treat to fans, the game’s creators have included several subtle Easter eggs paying tribute to the Black Panther actor Chadwick Boseman, who tragically died in August aged 43.

Observant fans noticed that one of the New York streets was named after him and a special dedication to the “noble king” was placed in the credits.

Cher pays powerful musical tribute to Joe Biden / Queerty

Cher pays powerful musical tribute to Joe Biden / Queerty

Continuing to lead the legion of stars and celebrities hoping to unseat Donald Trump next Tuesday, Cher performed a special tribute to Democratic Vice Presidential Candidate Joe Biden.

Cher dusted off the Oscar-nominated tune Happiness Is a Thing Called Joe from the 1943 film Cabin in the Sky, part of a concert aimed at increasing turnout. The I Will Vote Concert also featured performances by John Legend, P!nk, Ben Platt, Black Eyed Peas, Jennifer Hudson, Billy Porter, and Darren Criss. Comedian George Lopez and Ana Navarro hosted the event.

Related: Joe Biden unveils latest secret weapon: Cher

The Fab Five of the Netflix show Queer Eye (really, who better?) introduced Cher, who performed the song with retooled lyrics aimed at Biden’s experience and ability to confront the ongoing crisis facing the nation.

Have a listen, and remember to vote on November 3.

For more information about voting–including registration deadlines and polling locations–refer to the voting center on our sister website LGBTQ Nation.

Graham Norton pays tribute to activists who ‘fought for tolerance’ in Ireland

Graham Norton

Graham Norton on December 4, 2018 in London, England. (David M. Benett/Dave Benett/Getty)

Graham Norton has paid tribute to those who “fought for tolerance in Ireland” while admitting that he “took the easy way out” by moving to London.

The BBC presenter, 57, grew up in Bandon, County Cork in Ireland before moving to London to pursue an acting career.

Born in 1963, Norton grew up in an Ireland that was steeped in Catholicism and where LGBT+ people were not welcomed.

Homosexuality was finally decriminalised in the country in 1993, while same-sex marriage was introduced in 2015. These changes did not happen by themselves – they were the result of decades of activism from queer people who fought tirelessly for change.

In the acknowledgements for his new book Home Stretch, Norton paid tribute to “all the people who stayed in Ireland to fight for the modern tolerant place it has become”, and said he “took the easy way out” by moving to London.

Graham Norton left Ireland and ‘moved where the gays were’.

Speaking to the Irish Independent, Norton said: “I moved where the gays were. I went to London. Where nobody knew me so there was none of that scariness and there were gay bars that were just on the street so I could walk in, and meet other gay people.”

He added: “And I don’t want to be glib about it, because those people who stayed, who went on the marches and did the petitions, are nameless and faceless and I’ll never get to actually thank them, but they did the hard work.

People should be proud of themselves. Ireland is transformed.

“I am aware that Ireland isn’t Nirvana – and I think if young people hear me talking they’ll think ‘what is wrong with him? It’s horrible here…’ Well, try being here in the late 70s!

“People should be proud of themselves. Ireland is transformed.”

Elsewhere in the interview, Norton said that he and his contemporaries, like Irish drag queen Panti Bliss, grew up in a society where being gay was not celebrated.

“You’re not going to go ‘yippee!’ You know it’s not a choice, you know it’s not something you did, but you feel like you’re less than.

“You feel like you failed. You don’t want to test people’s love, because you don’t love you.”

NCLR tribute to Phyllis Lyon – Lesbian.com

NCLR tribute to Phyllis Lyon – Lesbian.com

Phyllis Lyon and Kathy Wolfe

Phyllis Lyon and Wolfe Video founder Kathy Wolfe.

NATIONAL CENTER FOR LESBIAN RIGHTS
Our community shared a collective sadness with the news of Phyllis Lyon’s passing on April 9th at the age of 95. An indicator of how much the world has changed in her lifetime, her fierce and indomitable presence was celebrated and honored well beyond the LGBTQ community. We have linked to some of this national coverage below.

For the National Center of Lesbian Rights, Phyllis Lyon and her partner of 58 years, Del Martin, were guidestars. One of the proudest moments in NCLR’s history was representing Phyllis and Del in California’s marriage equality case. Phyllis and Del’s courage paved the way for marriage equality under the California Constitution.

Phyllis and Del were the first same-sex couple to be married in San Francisco on June 16th, 2008. Merely weeks later, Del passed away at age 87 with Phyllis by her side. What came before that moment was decades of activism, boldness, humor and love.

NCLR’s former executive director and dear friend of Phyllis Lyon, Kate Kendell, shared this incredible timeline of Phyllis’ life.

This moment to celebrate Phyllis is also a moment to reflect. In 1955, Del and Phyllis were founders of the Daughters of Bilitis, the first lesbian civil and political rights organization. They were the first lesbians to join the National Organization of Women. Phyllis, once an administrative assistant to Rev. Cecil Williams at Glide Memorial Church, and Del played key roles in launching the Council on Religion and the Homosexual (CRH) and the Alice B. Toklas Democrative Club and, in 1979, became the namesakes of an activist-created health clinic, Lyon-Martin Health Services. These are just a few examples of their activism and involvement.

As a feminist-founded organization, NCLR stands on the shoulders of Phyllis and Del. At our inception in 1977, the women’s rights movement and the Gay movement were changing the political landscape, but lesbians had difficulty finding a seat at either table. Phyllis Lyon was just what we needed. When Donna Hitchens founded NCLR, it was to meet the immediate and dire needs of women losing their children because of their sexual orientation. Today, NCLR’s mission is to hold the heart and create equity for our entire LGBTQ community. No one left behind. Period.

Phyllis Lyon knew no boundaries when it came to her intellectual and activist power and we are forever indebted to her for her bravery and leadership. She set an example for us all. We know for us at NCLR, we intend to do whatever it takes to follow her lead and hold up her legacy.